Mining exclusively on solar power. : Bitcoin

Atlas Rising: Utilizing Solar Energy for Crypto Mining

Before I acquired a better knowledge of blockchain technology, I almost got scammed by unscrupulous fellows who promised to help me secure a Bitcoin mining app for a fee. The supposed app was to be minting few satoshi everyday for me by just keeping it running on my android phone. I almost fell for this scam until I read about the rigorous process involved in mining bitcoin. Many people have lost their hard earned money to these fraudsters who paraded themselves as blockchain miners.
The other way people lose their funds is through investing on cryptocurrencies that are not promising. Most people never bother to do a background check on the type of crypto they want to buy and hold. After buying the crypto with their hard-earned money, hoping to make an appreciable gain later on, they discover that the price of the crypto plunges instead of rising.
Blockchain technology has not received a worldwide adoption due to these underlying factors that scare many people away, and depriving them of the benefits of using the technology.
Atlas Rising created a project, the first of its kind, that functions more like a mutual fund and also utilizes solar energy. The project will utilize solar energy to mine cryptocurrency in order to reduce cost and environmental pollution. Atlas Rising is giving everyone an opportunity to invest into a more sustainable future via blockchain technology.
Barriers Preventing Mass Adoption of Blockchain
Mining of cryptocurrency is known to be electricity consuming. Many people have raised their concerns over the outrageous rate at which the ASIC miners consume part of the world's electricity. Also it is worrisome that the energy expended while using the ASIC miners can not be renewed. The cost of electricity has made the mining unprofitable to entrepreneurs who attempted to use the mining devices.
Blockchain is perceived by a large percentage of people as a subject for only the technology savvy. They do not want to dabble into what they know nothing or a little about. This has slowed down the mainstream adoption of blockchain technology.
Cryptocurrency market is still volatile. Unlike the conventional currencies that are more stable, cryptocurrencies are susceptible to inflation.
Atlas Rising Benefits Atlas Rising is making use of green energy that is 100% renewable to mine cryptos. The solar plants will have the capacity to generate sufficient energy that is independent on the world's electricity. One of such solar projects of Atlas Rising is an 85,000 square foot warehouse which can generate up to 2,400,000 watts of power after installing solar panels on its rooftop.

Rising Token The native token used on the Atlas Rising ecosystem is named Rising Token. Atlas Rising is making it possible for people to receive rewards that are generated through the solar arrays in Bitcoin. Holders of Rising token are entitled to receive this Bitcoin rewards. In order to ensure that individuals hold Rising token for the long term, and to discourage pump and dumb, the token will only be listed on an exchange after sustainable net assets.
Conclusion Blockchain is not adopted worldwide yet largely due to the misconception of many people about it. Some are of the opinion that it takes being a tech-savvy before one can invest in cryptocurrency. They believe that until you get the expertise and adequate knowledge, you cannot dabble into Blockchain. Atlas Rising is using its team which comprises experienced crypto miners and entrepreneurs to help people to choose the best cryptos with potential for growth and profits. Atlas Rising is also making use of solar energy to mine cryptocurrencies to reduce cost, eliminate pollution and shed miners' power loads form the world's electricity.
For more information, click on the link below:
Atlas Rising Website Whitepaper
submitted by Jimohwasiu to subreddit [link] [comments]

I wanna try mining for the first time in 5-6 years, I need some advice

So a really long time ago, when I was 12-13, I decided to try mining bitcoin. I got two ASICS that’s ran at 200ghs each and set them up. I made around 3 bucks a week, but because I couldn’t figure out how to let them run without having my WiFi disabled, I turned them off. HUGE MISTAKE now that I look back, but oh well. It was kind of fun, but at the time wouldn’t have made sense anyways since electricity costed about $0.25 per kWh so there would be no profitability.
Now that I’m 18, I kind of want to try again, but I had some questions. I went on eBay and bid on a couple Antminer S9s.
Are those any good? One of the listing is for 10 of them, but some may be broken. If I win that, idk if it would use up too much electricity.
My mom and grandma both have solar panels and both said it would be ok if I test the miners at their house, and I agreed to pay the difference if their bill went up.
Does anyone know if the miners would soak up all the electricity from the solar panels, and then some? If not how many would be too much? I know every solar system differs, but idk where to find the energy production of these panels, so any anecdotal advice would help! Or any advice on where I can find information would help also! Thank you!
submitted by Cartmanhartman to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to offset high electric usage

I have some bitcoin miners running in my house. Not only does it take energy to run them, it also takes energy to cool the house in the summer. Right now, I have solar panels on the roof, but it only offsets a portion of the miner's electrical usage.
My question is, can I use a nat. gas generator and hook it up to my electric system somehow to backfeed to the grid to offset TOU charges and/or to avoid going into a higher tier. Once you exceed a certain amount of usage, it can be more economical to burn nat. gas for energy then it is to use energy from the grid.
For example, could I run a generator that plugs into my system to either feed the house/backfeed to the grid? I'd think this would need to be on the solar side so the backfeed safety shutoff shuts off not only the solar energy, but also the generator energy.
Is this possible?
Edit: The miners are ASICs. All combined they probably draw about 10,000-14,000 watts 24/7. It's definitely not just a desktop computer. When I start to hit crazy-high grid rates as I get into higher levels of usage, then it starts to make economic sense to run a nat. gas generator to offset the usage, despite the higher cost of nat. gas-produced energy.
submitted by tdave22 to Electricity [link] [comments]

What coin is your "sleeper" coin that has a promising future?

Thank you all for sharing! A summary of results and findings to be posted here within 24 hours!
Update 9/2/17 (Not organized):
Mentions:
2 Tierion, 7 Vertcoin, 2 Pied Piper, 9 ARK, Binance Coin, 2 LoMoCoin, OMG, 17 District0x, 7 Monero, 8 IOTA, DeepOnion, 5 Agrello, 10 Factom, 1 Metal, *3 Nexus, NoLimitCoin (NLC2), Ember, 4 signatum, 4 Funfair, 3 Rise, groestlcoin (grs), bitquark, 2 bitquence (BQX), bitsend, 5 nav, datum, 2 0x exchange (zrx), 3 BAT, 2 Peercoin, 1 bytom, sys coin, 2 sia, 1 stox, 2 tenx, 2 decred, 3 ripple XRP, oxycoin, 4 OMG, 2 IOC, 3 ASCH, Oxycoin, 2 Lisk, 3 *Zcoin, 2 BLOCKNET, komodo, 2 pivx, game, mgo, linx, viacoin, xspec, qrl, voise, *bitbean, bitbay, 3 ubiq, 3 iconomi, 2 taas, bet, shift, crown, *singulardtv (sngls), myst, maidsafe, synereo, particl, 2 *cat, nem, lykke, *adex (adx), 2 verge (xvg), *raiblocks (XRB), suncontract (SNC), *diamond (DMD), mooncoin, *cloak, walton (WTC), counterparty (XCP), sickcoin, MEMETIC, wild beast block (WBB), civic, ponzi, biblepay, gene-chain, aragon, gulden, byteball, patientory, 2 stellar lumens (XLM), qtum, EOS, WBC, 23 skidoo, stealthcoin, digibyte, coss ico, dobbscoin, opus (OPT)
Tierion: FCT competitor Vertcoin: lightning network & Atomic swaps, longterm mining drama solution via asic resistance useful 3-5 years from now, ltc fork. "If I understood LN + atomic swaps correctly, I can see BTC users atomic swapping to the ridiculously cheap VTC chain to transfer their coins to the intended party, then that party swaps back to BTC later. I mean, this is what I would do if the fees made sense. While this might take away some utility from LTC, few people know about VTC, and the total of both coins (2 x 84 million) will never be enough for the world if you take future growth and adoption into consideration." - corpski Pied Piper: those guys fuck ark: easy way to build blockchain apps, no good marketing yet, so will be big after that Binance Coin: Binanc exchange's coin LomoCoin: Chinese pokemon go geocaching app with new v2.0 coming out OMG: Best way to spend your crypto, will be around despite success of any crypto *Agrello: Legal stuff Factom: Adopted and funded by bill gates, DHS, used in the real world, few other competitors with this much current use. probably slow but steady growth though with better utilization of blockchains. Metal: consistenly doubled ~every month, new signatum: "About to get PoS, a roadmap that is being quickly ticked through and constant development. Dedicated and fair. It's a literal steal right now and once people realise staking will just make money for them, the more holders and the less sellers, unlike now with many miners selling. It's reliable and honest, a fresh reality in the ICO scam filled marketplace. " -skeetskeet172 Nexus: "former spacex founders launching cube-sats around the world to decentralize the dectranlization" -Raynre + soon to boom after conference ~mid september Rise: lisk copy warnings district: "once the masses adopt and wrap their heads around the idea of ethereum and other app based platforms, they'll need a way to implement into real world applications. E-commerce, social platforms, blogs that pay directly for views, etc. DNT is paving a way for everyone (without programming knowledge) to take part in the decentralization world. In my opinion this is huge for the long run." - sdot123 *Bitquence: bring investments to the masses Nav: Polymorph and staking, risky but ambitious 61,000,000 limited supply, ~flavor of month in december. zrx: can't find a good reason why this decentralized exchange will succeed and purpose of the token? BAT: founder of javascript despite the sour ICO Peercoin: long long history of failures and innovation but not giving up bytom syscoin: merge mining with bitcoin tenx: omg partnership, few credit cards, backed by vitalik decred: open structure, governance, only vote for a hard fork ripple: $5+ trillion transferred using SWIFT, $50 mil FEDWIRE, 1.5 bil on CHIPS ASCH: any coding language side chain creation, very active big team, pending big exchange approval bitbean: due for name change soon, staking, funny/moniker name (bean) zcoin: better than zcash/monero once roadmap is done: better POW, incentivizd nodes, trustless setup, permanent anonymous addresses, faster times, currently only $35mil market cap, used bitcoin code, asic resistant bitbay: valued <5x sys coin competitor, novel rolling peg, pos, dedicated underdog dev who was screwed over by his own team shift: decentralize the web crown: digital commodities, and more, neither POS or POW but ATOMIC in 1 month CAT: Creating ethereum smart contracts visually raiblocks: is like IOTA, close to coming to bittrex, 0 transaction fees suncontract: buyign and selling electricity. Will eb used for solar market.. Really good cause! mooncoin: in one year cloak: closed source, said to be better than monero/dash when goes open source *walton: NEW, chinese site but patents and samsung vp on board, patents for integration of iot and rfid and blockchain, only one binance right now and will balloon afterwards, https://twitter.com/Waltonchain counterparty: extends bitcoin to create assets *MEME: blockchain secured images. but how do they afford image hosting costs? wild beast block PonziCoin: definitely not a ponzi scheme of sorts... biblepay: religion ftw gene chain: sleepiest sleeper of sleepers. a very very specific sue case in bioinformatics, made first node sale to a genomics lab and about to publish a paper soon. gulden: send money but every new user causes gulden value to go up. can buy with cash on website right now. ubiq: said to be throttled by bittrex/killed. *OPUS: NEW
submitted by mannanj to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Profitability: How Long Does it Take to Mine One Bitcoin in 2019?

When it comes to Bitcoin (BTC) mining, the major questions on people’s minds are “how profitable is Bitcoin mining” and “how long would it take to mine one Bitcoin?” To answer these questions, we need to take an in-depth look at the current state of the Bitcoin mining industry — and how it has changed — over the last several years.
Bitcoin mining is, essentially, the process of participating in Bitcoin’s underlying security mechanism — known as proof-of-work — to help secure the Bitcoin blockchain. In return, participants receive compensation in bitcoins (BTC).
When you participate in Bitcoin mining, you are essentially searching for blocks by crunching complex cryptographic challenges using your mining hardware. Once a block is discovered, new transactions are recorded and verified within the block and the block discoverer receives the block rewards — currently set at 12.5 BTC — as well as the transactions fees for the transactions included within the block.
Once the maximum supply of 21 million Bitcoins has been mined, no further Bitcoins will ever come into existence. This property makes Bitcoin deflationary, something which many argue will inevitably increase the value of each Bitcoin unit as it becomes more scarce due to increased global adoption.
The limited supply of Bitcoin is also one of the reasons why Bitcoin mining has become so popular. In previous years, Bitcoin mining proved to be a lucrative investment option — netting miners with several fold returns on their investment with relatively little effort.
bitcoin mining hardware
Mining Hardware
The mining hardware you choose will mostly depend on your circumstances — in terms of budget, location and electricity costs. Since the amount of hashing power you can dedicate to the mining process is directly correlated with how much Bitcoin you will mine per day, it is wise to ensure your hardware is still competitive in 2019.
Bitcoin uses SHA256 as its mining algorithm. Because of this, only hardware compatible with this algorithm can be used to mine Bitcoin. Although it is technically possible to mine Bitcoin on your current computer hardware — using your CPU or GPU — this will almost certainly not generate a positive return on your investment and you may end up damaging your device.
The most cost-effective way to mine Bitcoin in 2019 is using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) mining hardware. These are specially-designed machines that offer much higher performance per watt than typical computers and have been an absolutely essential purchase for anybody looking to get into Bitcoin mining since the first Avalon ASICs were shipped in 2013.
When it comes to selecting Bitcoin mining hardware, there are several main parameters to consider — though the importance of each of these may vary based on personal circumstances and budget.
Performance per Watt
When it comes to Bitcoin mining, performance per watt is a measure of how many gigahashes per watt a machine is capable of and is, hence, a simple measure of its efficiency. Since electricity costs are likely to be one of the largest expenses when mining Bitcoin, it is usually a good idea to ensure that you are getting good performance per watt out of your hardware.
Ideally, your mining hardware would be highly efficient, allowing it to mine Bitcoin with lower energy requirements — though this will need to be balanced with acquisition costs, as often the most efficient hardware is also the most expensive. This means it may take longer to see a return on investment.
In countries with cheap electricity, performance per watt is often less of a concern than acquisition costs and price-performance ratio. In most countries, operating outdated mining hardware is typically cost prohibitive, as energy costs outweigh the income generated by the mining equipment.
However, this may not be the case for those operating in countries with extremely cheap electricity — such as Kuwait and Venezuela — as even older equipment can still be profitable. Similarly, miners with a free energy surplus, such as from wind or solar electric generators, can benefit from the minimal gains offered by still running outdated hardware.
Longevity
The lifetime of mining hardware also plays a critical role in determining how profitable your mining venture will be. It’s always a good idea to do whatever possible to ensure it runs as smoothly as possible.
Since mining equipment tends to run at a full (or almost full) load for extended periods, they also tend to break down and fail more frequently than most electronics — which can seriously damage your profitability. Equipment failure is even more common when purchasing second-hand equipment. Since warranty claims are often challenging, it can often take a long time to receive a warranty replacement.
Price-Performance Ratio
In many cases, one of the major criteria used to select mining hardware is the price-performance ratio — a measure of how much performance a machine outputs per unit price. In the case of cryptocurrency mining hardware, this is commonly expressed as gigahashes per dollar or GH/$.
Under ideal circumstances, the mining hardware would have a high price-performance ratio, ensuring you get a lot of bang for your buck. However, this must also be considered in combination with the acquisition costs and the expected lifetime of the machine — since the absolute most powerful machines are not always the cheapest or the most energy efficient.
Acquisition Costs
Acquisition costs are almost always the biggest barrier to entry for most Bitcoin miners since most top-end mining hardware costs several thousand dollars. This problem is further compounded by the fact that many hardware manufacturers offer discounts for bulk purchases, allowing those with deeper pockets to achieve a better price-performance ratio.
Acquisition costs include all the costs involved in purchasing any mining equipment, including hardware costs, shipping costs, import duties, and any further costs. For example, many ASIC miners do not include a power supply — which can be another considerable expense, since the 1,000W+ power supplies usually required tend to cost several hundred dollars alone.
Ensuring your equipment runs smoothly can also add in additional costs, such as cooling and maintenance expenses. In addition, some miners may want to invest in uninterruptible power supplies to ensure their hardware keeps running — even if the power fails temporarily.
asic mining
Current Generation Hardware
One of the most recent additions to the Bitcoin mining hardware market is the Ebang Ebit E11++, which was released in October 2018. Using a 10nm fabrication process for its processors, the Ebit E11++ is able to achieve one of the highest hash rates on the market at 44TH/s.
In terms of efficiency, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is arguably the best on the market, offering 44TH/s of hash rate while drawing just 1,980W of power, offering 22.2GH/W performance. However, as of writing, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is out of stock until March 31, 2019 — while its price of $2,024 (excluding shipping) may make it prohibitively expensive for those first getting involved with Bitcoin mining.
Another popular choice is the ASICminer 8 Nano, a machine released in October 2018 that offers 44TH/s for $3,900 excluding shipping. The ASICminer 8 Nano draws 2,100W of power, giving it an efficiency of almost 21GH/W — slightly lower than the Ebit E11++ while costing almost double the price. However, unlike the E11++, the 8 Nano is actually in stock and available to purchase.
ASICminer also offers the 8 Nano Pro, a machine launched in mid-2018 that offers 80 TH/s of hash rate for $9,500 (excluding shipping). However, unlike the Ebit E11++ and 8 Nano, the minimum order quantity for the 8 Nano Pro is curiously set at five, meaning you will need to lay out a minimum of $47,500 in order to actually get your hands on one (or five).
While the 8 Nano Pro doesn’t offer the same performance per watt as the Ebit E11+ or AICMiner 8 Nano, it is one of the quieter miners on this list, making it more suitable for a home or office environment. That being said, the ASICminer 8 Nano Pro is easily the most expensive miner per TH on this list — costing a whopping $118.75/TH, compared to the $46/TH offered by the E11++ and $88.64 offered by the 8 Nano.
The latest hardware on this list is the Innosilicon T3 43T, which is currently available for pre-order at $2,279, and estimated to ship in March 2019. Offering 43TH/s of performance at 2,100W, the T3 43T comes in at an efficiency of 20.4GH/W, which is around 10 percent less energy efficient than the Ebit E11++.
The T3 43T also has a minimum order quantity of three units, making the minimum acquisition cost $6837 + shipping for preorders. All in all, the T3 43T is more costly and less efficient than the E11++ but may arrive slightly earlier since Ebang will not ship the E11++ units until at least end March 29, 2019.
Finally, this list would not be complete without including Bitmain’s latest offering, the Antminer S15-28TH/s, which — as its name suggests — offers 28TH/s of hash power while drawing just under 1600W at the wall. The Antminer S15 is one of the only SHA256 miners to use 7nm processors, making it somewhat smaller than some of the other devices on this list.
Like most pieces of top-end Bitcoin mining hardware, the Antminer S15 27TH/s model is currently sold out, with current orders not shipping until mid-February 2019. However, the S15 is offered at a significantly lower price than many of its competitors at just $1020 (excluding shipping), with no minimum quantity restriction. At these rates, the Antminer comes in at just $37.78/TH — though its energy efficiency is a much less impressive 17.5GH/W.
Mining Hardware Mining Hardware Comparison
Performance (GH/W) Price Performance Ratio ($/TH)
Ebang Ebit E11++ 22.2GH/W $46/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano 21GH/W $88.64/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano Pro 19GH/W $118.75/TH
Innosilicon T3 43T 20.4GH/W $53/TH
Antminer S15-28TH/s 17.5GH/W $37.78/TH
How To Select a Good Mining Pool
Mining pools are platforms that allow miners to pool their resources together to achieve a higher collective hash rate — which, in turn, allows the collective to mine more blocks than they would be able to achieve alone.
Typically, these mining pools will distribute block rewards to contributing miners based on the proportion of the hash rate they supply. If a pool contributing a total of 20 TH/s of hash rate successfully mines the next block, a user responsible for 10 percent of this hash rate will receive 10 percent of the 12.5 BTC reward.
Pools essentially allow smaller miners to compete with large private mining organizations by ensuring that the collective hash rate is high enough to successfully mine blocks on regular basis. Without operating through a mining pool, many miners would be unlikely to discover any blocks at all — due to only contributing a tiny fraction of the overall Bitcoin hash rate.
While it is quite possible to be successful mining without a pool, this typically requires an extremely large mining operation and is usually not recommended — unless you have enough hash rate to mine blocks on a regular basis.
Although it is technically possible to discover blocks mining solo and keep the entire 12.5 BTC reward for yourself, the odds of this actually occurring are practically zero — making pool collaboration practically the only way to compete in 2019 and beyond.
Selecting the best pool for you can be a challenging job since the vast majority of pools are quite similar and offer similar features and comparable fees. Because of this, we have broken down the qualities you should be looking for in a new pool into four categories; reputation, hash rate, pool fees, and usability/features:
Reputation
The reputation of a pool is one of the most important factors in selecting the pool that is best for you. Well-reputed pools will tend to be much larger than newer or less well-established pools since few pools with a poor reputation can stand the test of time.
Well-reputed pools also tend to be more transparent about their operation, many of which provide tools to ensure that each user is getting the correct reward based on the hash rate contributed. By using only pools with a great reputation, you also ensure your hash rate is not being used for nefarious purposes — such as powering a 51 percent attack.
When comparing a list of pools that appear suitable for you, it is a wise move to read their user reviews before making your choice — ensuring you don’t end up mining at a pool that steals your hard-fought earnings.
Hash Rate
When it comes to mining Bitcoin, the probability of discovering the next block is directly related to the amount of hashing power you contribute to the network. Because of this, one of the major features you should be considering when selecting your pool is its total hash rate — which is often closely related to the proportion of new blocks mined by the pool
Since the total hash rate of a pool is directly related to how quickly it discovers new blocks, this means the largest pools tend to discover a relative majority of blocks — leading to more regular rewards. However, the very largest pools also tend the have higher fees but often make up for this with sheer success and additional features.
Sometimes, some of the largest pools have a minimum hash rate requirement ù leaving some of the smaller miners left out of the loop. Although smaller pools typically have more relaxed requirements with reduced performance thresholds, these pools may be only slightly more profitable than mining solo.
Pool Fees
When choosing a suitable pool, typically one of the major considerations is its fees. Typically, most pools will charge a small fee that is deducted from your earnings and is usually around 1-2 percent — but sometimes slightly lower or higher.
There are also pools that offer 0 percent fees. However, these are often much smaller than the major pools and tend to make their money in a different way — such as through monthly subscriptions or donations.
Ideally, you will choose the pool that offers the best balance of fees to other features. Usually, the pool with the absolute lowest fees is not the best choice. Additionally, pools with the lowest fees often have the highest withdrawal minimums — making pool hopping uneconomical for most.
Usability and Features
When first starting out with Bitcoin mining, learning how to set up a pool and navigating through the settings can be a challenge. Because of this, several pools target their services to newer users by offering a simple to navigate user interface and providing detailed learning resources and prompt customer support.
However, for more experienced miners, simple pools don’t tend to offer a variety of features needed to maximize profitability. For example, although many mining pools focus their entire hash rate towards mining a single cryptocurrency, some are large enough to offer additional options — allowing users to mine other SHA256 coins such as Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Fantom if they choose.
These pools are technically more challenging to use and mostly designed for those familiar with mining, happy to hop from coin to coin mining whichever is most profitable at the time. There are even some exchanges that automatically direct their combined hash rate at the most profitable cryptocurrency — taking the guesswork out of the equation.
bitcoin mining pool
Best Mining Pools for 2019
The Bitcoin mining pool industry has a large number of players, but the vast majority of the Bitcoin hash rate is concentrated within just a few pools. Currently, there are dozens of suitable pools to choose from — but we have selected just a few of the best to help get you started on your journey.
Slushpool was the first Bitcoin mining pool released, being launched way back in 2010 under the name “Bitcoin Pooled Mining Server.” Since then, Slushpool has grown into one of the most popular pools around — currently accounting for just under 10 percent of the total Bitcoin hash rate.
Although Slushpool isn’t one of the very largest pools, it does offer a newbie-friendly interface alongside more advanced features for those that need them. The pool has moderately high fees of 2 percent but offers servers in several countries — including the U.S., Europe, China, and Japan — giving it a good balance of fees to features.
BTC.com is another potential candidate for your pool and currently stands as the largest public Bitcoin mining pool. It is responsible for mining around 17 percent of new blocks. Being the largest public mining pool provides users with a sense of security, ensuring blocks are mined regularly and a stable income is made.
Image courtesy of Blockchain.info.
BTC.com is owned by Bitmain, a company that manufacturers mining hardware, and charges a 1.5 percent fees — placing it squarely in the middle-tier in terms of fees. Unlike other platforms, BTC.com uses its own payment structure known as FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), which means miners also receive a share of the transaction fees included within mined blocks — making it slightly more profitable than standard payment per share (PPS) pools.
Another great option is Antpool, a mining pool that supports mining services for 10 different cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Litecoin (LTC) and Ethereum (ETH). AntPool frequently trades places with BTC.com as the largest Bitcoin mining pool. However, as of this writing, it occupies the title of the third-largest public mining pool.
What sets Antpool apart from other pools is the ability to choose your own fee system — including PPS, PPS+, and PPLNS. If you choose PPLNS, using Antpool is free but you will not receive any transaction fees from any blocks mined. Antpool also offers regular payouts and has a low minimum payout of just 0.001 BTC, making it suitable for smaller miners.
Last on the list of the best Bitcoin mining pools in 2019 is the Bitcoin.com mining pool. Although this is one of the smaller pools available, the Bitcoin.com pool has some redeeming features that make it worth a look. It offers mining contracts, allowing you to test out Bitcoin mining before investing in mining equipment of your own. According to Bitcoin.com, they are the highest paying Pay Per Share (PPS) pool in the world, offering up to 98 percent block rewards as well as automatic switching between BTC and BCH mining to optimize profitability.

Electricity Costs
While your mining hardware is most important when it comes to how much BTC you can earn when mining, your electricity costs are usually the largest additional expense. With electricity costs often varying dramatically between countries, ensuring you are on the best cost-per-KWh plan available will help to keep costs down when mining.
Most commonly, large mining operations will be set up in countries where electricity costs are the lowest — such as Iceland, India, and Ukraine. Since China has one of the lowest energy costs in the world, it was previously the epicenter of Bitcoin mining. However, since the government began cracking down on cryptocurrencies, it has largely fallen out of favor with miners.
Technically, Venezuela is one of the cheapest countries in the world in terms of electricity, with the government heavily subsidizing these energy costs — while Bitcoin offers an escape from the hyperinflation suffered by the Venezuelan bolivar. Despite this, importing mining hardware into the country is a costly endeavor, making it impractical for many people.
Finding ways to lower your electricity costs is one of the best ways to improve your mining profitability. This can include investing in renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, or wind — which can yield increased profitability over the long term.
if you are looking to buy bitcoin mining equipment here is some links:

Model Antminer S17 Pro (56Th) from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 56Th/s for a power consumption of 2385W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s17-pro-56th-copy/?wpam_id=17
Model Antminer S9K from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 14Th/s for a power consumption of 1323W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s9k-14-th-s/?wpam_id=17
Model T2T 30Tfrom Innosilicon mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 30Th/s for a power consumption of 2200W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/innosilicon-t2t-30t/?wpam_id=17
mining wholesale website:
https://miningwholesale.eu/?wpam_id=17
submitted by mohamadk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

December 18, 2032. Bitcoin is dead.

December 18, 2032. Its lunchtime, and the front page of the e-newspaper has a big story about SpaceX landing on Mars again, but the article at the bottom of the page catches your eye. In bold letters it declares BITCOIN IS DEAD (for the 2,437th time), and you can’t help but roll your eyes as you take a sip of your coffee.
Why is bitcoin dead? Climate change! The author claims that bitcoin is incentivizing dangerous practices that will destroy our planet! You can’t help but laugh, considering the fact that bitcoin pretty much single-handedly dismantled the oil and gas industry in the mid 2020s. For the past decade, it has been considered a champion of green energy! So why the current change of heart? Allow me to explain:
Since the earliest days, bitcoin mining has been competitive. The first blocks were mined on CPUs, but soon GPUs were hacked to hash sha256, and then in 2013, the first ASIC miners hit the market. At the same time, the bitcoin price exploded, and the world began to pay attention a little more seriously. Money started to trickle in, and the race to build the most efficient ASIC miner possible intensified.
The mining industry exploded! The best ASICs available were being produced as quickly as possible, and people all around the world were plugging them in, hoping to get lucky. Soon, the network was using an incredible amount of energy, and people started to worry: how much power is too much?
However, at the same time, the bitcoin miners were still in stiff competition to be the most efficient. The industry was bigger and more competitive than ever, and since ASIC chips were pushing the bleeding edge of manufacturing technique, miners were forced to look for other ways to innovate in order to gain an advantage. A lot of different schemes were hatched, but the miners that chose to invest in aggressively reducing their energy costs were the ones that survived.
As the bitcoin price soared to new heights, the incentive to innovate became extreme, and solar power quickly became the cheapest energy source the world had ever known. Bitcoin was a hero! With the sun burning brightly, humanity could now easily tap into a vast supply of solar energy, soon, massive solar farms were established in ideal locations around the world, collecting every photon they could. The oil and gas giants of the 20th century lost their dominance of the energy market at an unprecedented rate, as advancements in solar cell tech pushed the cost of electricity down an order of magnitude lower than fossil fuels could ever hope to achieve. The final stake in the fossil fuel grave came when a youtube video was released, showing how to easily mod your vehicle’s engine to run on solar power, complete with printable 3D parts files. There was even an optional add-on to install an ASIC miner in the trunk, to take advantage of any excess solar energy your car would collect. Very cool!
Greenhouse gas emissions dropped to levels a well-meaning politician could only dream of achieving, and it was all thanks to bitcoin! Prices skyrocketed to levels even the most hardened hodlers had trouble not being surprised by, while at the same time the shitcoin market was a sea of red tears for months on end. It was an incredible thing to witness, no doubt.
So then why all the fuss? Why is bitcoin dead, once more?
Well, after years of aggressive expansion, miners have now covered approximately 37% of the Earth’s land mass with solar panels, and because of this, the earth’s climate has cooled down considerably, causing violent and unpredictable weather in some areas. Solar energy that would normally heat the earth's atmosphere is now being used to compute rounds of SHA256. The ASIC miners eventually dissipate the stored energy as heat, but since the advent of underground mining practices (to help protect advanced ASIC chips from cosmic ray degradation), this heat is absorbed the by bedrock instead of the air, and the effects have been quite noticeable. Beyond the land, there are even rumours of huge and hostile solar-powered mining farms floating off the coast of Africa. The so-called bitcoin pirates of the high seas! What a time to be alive.
But what now? Will bitcoin die? What solutions are possible? There is one group of miners that are battling back by running outdated hardware from the mid 2010’s. They claim that the old ASIC machines run hotter and less efficiently, so they’re helping warm the earth more per hash… but another article called them out as being “energy-wasting, idealist, crypto-hippies”, so maybe that isn’t the best solution after all.
You look up the e-news page, and see the SpaceX article staring back at you. Wait! Suddenly it hits you: if the solar panels were in space, humanity’s problem would be solved! You pull out your phone and head straight to twitter to hit up the man himself directly:
“@ElonMusk you should build a solar mining farm in space! That would be great. Thx”
You can’t help but smile as you put your phone back in your pocket. Long ago you learned that bitcoin isn’t dead, and the faithful hodler has nothing to worry about. And besides, Elon is a smart dude, chances are he’s already two steps ahead of you on this one.
Now then, time to check coinmarketcap just once more before you get back to work…
[Edit: fixed a typo or two. Edit 2: updated the story to be more thermodynamically correct. Shoutout the physicists in the comments for keeping things in check :D ]
submitted by Chytrik to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How much Power it takes to create a Bitcoin?

How much Power it takes to create a Bitcoin?
https://preview.redd.it/q8fybks5d3r31.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=0d9836d98582d8652a82a99333d37b2885d4116e
Bitcoin Mining Costs Vary by Region
To perform a cost calculation to understand how much power it takes to create bitcoin, first, you’d need to know electricity costs where you live. In 2017, the Crescent Electric Supply Company did a state-by-state breakdown of how much it costs to mine a single bitcoin. Louisiana came in as the cheapest location at $3,224, while Hawaii was the most expensive at $9,483. As of September 2018, bitcoin’s exchange rate was valued at about $6,700 for a single bitcoin, which shows that doing the work in an area where energy costs are very low is important to make the practice worthwhile.
Calculating the Cost
There are lots of different bitcoin mining computers out there, but many companies have focused on Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) mining computers, which use less energy to conduct their calculations. Mining companies that run lots of ASIC miners as businesses claim they use one watt of power for every gigahash per second of computing performed when mining for bitcoins.
At this rate, the bitcoin network runs at 342,934,450 watts — roughly 343 megawatts. Calculations based on EIA data reveal that the average U.S. household consumes about 1.2 kilowatts of power, meaning that 343 megawatts would be enough to power 285,833 U.S. homes.
That’s quite a lot of energy — for a frame of reference, that equates to about a third of the homes in San Jose, California. Since 1 watt per gigahash/second is pretty efficient, it’s likely that this is a conservative estimate. Also, a large number of residential users take more power to run their miners.
BITCOIN may be a useful way to send and receive money, but cryptocurrency doesn’t come for free. The community of computer-based miners that create bitcoins uses vast quantities of electrical power in the process. The electric resource-heavy process has led some experts to suggest that bitcoin isn’t very environmentally friendly. Therefore, using SOLAR ENERGY to mine Bitcoin is considered more suitable for people.
submitted by TrustcoinCommunity to u/TrustcoinCommunity [link] [comments]

Mining Bitcoin - The Coming Environmental Subsidy

Mining Bitcoin - The Coming Environmental Subsidy.
Mining Bitcoin incentives one to stake hardware and electricity in return for digital assets, which have or can have a market price that exceeds the cost of the electricity staked. Bitcoin is an uncorrelated hedge against the world economy, it’s programmable scarcity, not perceived scarcity, and is perhaps the hardest money the world has ever seen. Coming and developing second layer protocols for Bitcoin will execute transactions at the speed of light, and for virtually no cost. In time a decentralized economy will become our new reality, and networks will be owned by their users. There will be lighter weight consensus algorithms for most networks, but Proof Of Work, and in turn Bitcoin, will be the internets reserve currency, and what we peg the value of all decentralized networks to in the coming “Web 3” world. Bitcoin is here to stay, and Bitcoin mining presents a new opportunity in renewable energy.
Today, miners are moving as fast as they can to scale, lower their power cost, and decrease counter party risk. We are seeing a trend with miners setting up modular data centres behind the meter, tucked up to power plants that are located in areas where capacity is not in line with local demand, so miners become an obvious choice to churn through the surplus capacity of these plants. The issue here as it pertains to “environmental concern” is that miners cannot enter into energy purchase agreements (EPA’s) with plants that produce renewable power intermittently. So the result, we have mining farms finding blocks with coal or gas. Operators setting up such mining infrastructure often cite opportunity cost, which is definitely understandable, but irrespective of environmental hazard, the opportunity & economics of mining with fossil fuels will be short lived. Additionally these fossil fuel miners are beginning to face major counter party risk. Buying power to mine from major corporations, public utilities, or governments is convoluted and risky. Even one day without access to electricity can affect the bottom line, miners must begin thinking about energy independence. In the next 5 years setting up or sustaining a fossil fuel farm will be akin to thinking its a good idea to open and run a blockbuster video.
There are two major changes happening now in mining, and these changes will be the principal underwriters of Bitcoins coming “Environmental Subsidy”.
  1. Cost reductions in renewables & storage.
  2. The decentralization of mining.
In 2009 the global average cost to produce a Mwh of Solar was $350, in 2018 it was $50. The global average for coal production in 2018 was $100 per Mwh. Couple the declining cost bases for renewables with supportive policy and subsidies, and from a more macro POV its obvious where were going in terms of the type of energy that will be flowing into the grid. Although the sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow, but there is a trend that is mitigating that - declining costs in storage. Today the average cost to the consumer of lithium ion storage is dropping rapidly, and multiple sources point to a cost base of $100 per Mwh or lower by 2025. In that not too distant future it is reasonable to speculate that we will see non grid tied mining ops running 24/7 - 365, whilst capturing and storing a surplus & finding blocks with their batteries.
Bitcoin mining is ironically centralized. Although with closer observation, we can see that mining centralization is the result of an expeditious technology adoption curve. In approximately 4-5 years miners went from CPUs, to GPUs, FPGAs, and now of course ASIC’s. These changes each represented more than 10,000X improvements, which meant that miners were completely writing down their hardware within 4-6 months. So to mine at scale in the earlier years, you basically needed direct access to a chip factory and massive capital. It made more sense for a hardware manufacturers to run their own hardware than to sell it, and in turn mining became centralized. Although were now close to the top of the hardware improvement curve, and will perhaps see improvements of 2X every 2 or 3 years going forward. So, with that being said, hardware manufactures have it in their best interest to sell their rigs, being that they no longer have the “chip advantage”. The plateau of mining hardware innovation marks the advent of mining decentralization.
In the coming years allocating some or all electricity generated at the point of production to mine Bitcoin, will allow one to amortize an investment in renewables sooner than if the power was sold into the grid. Bitcoin will become the reserve currency of the internet and as such de-risk the capital deployed in renewables when operators of renewable energy assets allocate some or all of their power to secure the Bitcoin blockchain. Electricity production will also become more decentralized as localized production and mini grids become complimentary to larger legacy points of production, which will in turn support the decentralization of mining. Our future energy needs will be met using renewables, and the same renewable power that heats our homes and charges our cars, will underpin the Bitcoin blockchain and the internet of money.
submitted by kalapa108 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Decred Journal – September 2018

Note: you can read this on GitHub (link), Medium (link) or old Reddit (link).

Development

Final version 1.3.0 of the core software was released bringing all the enhancements reported last month to the rest of the community. The groundwork for SPV (simplified payment verification) is complete, another reduction of fees is being deployed, and performance stepped up once again with a 50% reduction in startup time, 20% increased sync speed and more than 3x faster peer delivery of block headers (a key update for SPV). Decrediton's integrations of SPV and Politeia are open for testing by experienced users. Read the full release notes and get the downloads on GitHub. As always, don't forget to verify signatures.
dcrd: completed several steps towards multipeer downloads, improved introduction to the software in the main README, continued porting cleanups and refactoring from upstream btcd.
Currently in review are initial release of smart fee estimator and a change to UTXO set semantics. The latter is a large and important change that provides simpler handling, and resolves various issues with the previous approach. A lot of testing and careful review is needed so help is welcome.
Educational series for new Decred developers by @matheusd added two episodes: 02 Simnet Setup shows how to automate simnet management with tmux and 03 Miner Reward Invalidation explains block validity rules.
Finally, a pull request template with a list of checks was added to help guide the contributors to dcrd.
dcrwallet: bugfixes and RPC improvements to support desktop and mobile wallets.
Developers are welcome to comment on this idea to derive stakepool keys from the HD wallet seed. This would eliminate the need to backup and restore redeem scripts, thus greatly improving wallet UX. (missed in July issue)
Decrediton: bugfixes, refactoring to make the sync process more robust, new loading animations, design polishing.
Politeia: multiple improvements to the CLI client (security conscious users with more funds at risk might prefer CLI) and security hardening. A feature to deprecate or timeout proposals was identified as necessary for initial release and the work started. A privacy enhancement to not leak metadata of ticket holders was merged.
Android: update from @collins: "Second test release for dcrandroid is out. Major bugs have been fixed since last test. Latest code from SPV sync has been integrated. Once again, bug reports are welcome and issues can be opened on GitHub". Ask in #dev room for the APK to join testing.
A new security page was added that allows one to validate addresses and to sign/verify messages, similar to Decrediton's Security Center. Work on translations is beginning.
Overall the app is quite stable and accepting more testers. Next milestone is getting the test app on the app store.
iOS: the app started accepting testers last week. @macsleven: "the test version of Decred Wallet for iOS is available, we have a link for installing the app but the builds currently require your UDID. Contact either @macsleven or @raedah with your UDID if you would like to help test.".
Nearest goal is to make the app crash free.
Both mobile apps received new design themes.
dcrdata: v3.0 was released for mainnet! Highlights: charts, "merged debits" view, agendas page, Insight API support, side chain tracking, Go 1.11 support with module builds, numerous backend improvements. Full release notes here. This release featured 9 contributors and development lead @chappjc noted: "This collaboration with @raedahgroup on our own block explorer and web API for @decredproject has been super productive.".
Up next is supporting dynamic page widths site wide and deploying new visual blocks home page.
Trezor: proof of concept implementation for Trezor Model T firmware is in the works (previous work was for Model One).
Ticket splitting: updated to use Go modules and added simnet support, several fixes.
docs: beginner's guide overhaul, multiple fixes and cleanups.
decred.org: added 3rd party wallets, removed inactive PoW pools and removed web wallet.
@Richard-Red is building a curated list of Decred-related GitHub repositories.
Welcome to new people contributing for the first time: @klebe, @s_ben, @victorguedes, and PrimeDominus!
Dev activity stats for September: 219 active PRs, 197 commits, 28.7k added and 18.8k deleted lines spread across 6 repositories. Contributions came from 4-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: started and ended the month around 75 PH/s, hitting a low of 60.5 and a new high of 110 PH/s. BeePool is again the leader with their share varying between 23-54%, followed by F2Pool 13-30%, Coinmine 4-6% and Luxor 3-5%. As in previous months, there were multiple spikes of unidentified hashrate.
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 98 DCR (+2.4). The price varied between 95.7 and 101.9 DCR. Locked DCR amount was 3.86-3.96 million DCR, or 45.7-46.5% of the supply.
Nodes: there are 201 public listening nodes and 325 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 5% are v1.4.0(pre) dev builds (+3%), 30% on v1.3.0 (+25%), 42% on v1.2.0 (-20%), 15% on v1.1.2 (-7%), 6% on v1.1.0. More than 76% of nodes run v1.2.0 and higher and therefore support client filters. Data as of Oct 1.

ASICs

Obelisk posted two updates on their mailing list. 70% of Batch 1 units are shipped, an extensive user guide is available, Obelisk Scanner application was released that allows one to automatically update firmware. First firmware update was released and bumped SC1 hashrate by 10-20%, added new pools and fixed multiple bugs. Next update will focus on DCR1. It is worth a special mention that the firmware source code is now open! Let us hope more manufacturers will follow this example.
A few details about Whatsminer surfaced this month. The manufacturer is MicroBT, also known as Bitwei and commonly misspelled as Bitewei. Pangolinminer is a reseller, and the model name is Whatsminer D1.
Bitmain has finally entered Decred ASIC space with their Antminer DR3. Hash rate is 7.8 TH/s while pulling 1410 W, at the price of $673. These specs mean it has the best GH/W and GH/USD of currently sold miners until the Whatsminer or others come out, although its GH/USD of 11.6 already competes with Whatsminer's 10.5. Discussed on Reddit and bitcointalk, unboxing video here.

Integrations

Meet our 17th voting service provider: decredvoting.com. It is operated by @david, has 2% fee and supports ticket splitting. Reddit thread is here.
For a historical note, the first VSP to support ticket splitting was decredbrasil.com:
@matheusd started tests on testnet several months ago. I contacted him so we could integrate with the pool in June this year. We set up the machine in July and bought the first split ticket on mainnet, using the decredbrasil pool, on July 19. It was voted on July 30. After this first vote on mainnet, we opened the tests to selected users (with more technical background) on the pool. In August we opened the tests to everyone, and would call people who want to join to the #ticket_splitting channel, or to our own Slack (in Portuguese, so mostly Brazilian users). We have 28 split tickets already voted, and 16 are live. So little more than 40 split tickets total were bought on decredbrasil pool. (@girino in #pos-voting)
KuCoin exchange listed DCBTC and DCETH pairs. To celebrate their anniversary they had a 99% trading fees discount on DCR pairs for 2 weeks.
Three more wallets integrated Decred in September:
ChangeNow announced Decred addition to their Android app that allows accountless swaps between 150+ assets.
Coinbase launched informational asset pages for top 50 coins by market cap, including Decred. First the pages started showing in the Coinbase app for a small group of testers, and later the web price dashboard went live.

Adoption

The birth of a Brazilian girl was registered on the Decred blockchain using OriginalMy, a blockchain proof of authenticity services provider. Read the full story in Portuguese and in English.

Marketing

Advertising report for September is ready. Next month the graphics for all the ads will be changing.
Marketing might seem quiet right now, but a ton is actually going on behind the scenes to put the right foundation in place for the future. Discovery data are being analyzed to generate a positioning strategy, as well as a messaging hierarchy that can guide how to talk about Decred. This will all be agreed upon via consensus of the community in the work channels, and materials will be distributed.
Next, work is being done to identify the right PR partner to help with media relations, media training, and coordination at events. While all of this is coming up to speed, we believe the website needs a refresher reflecting the soon to be agreed upon messaging, plus a more intuitive architecture to make it easier to navigate. (@Dustorf)

Events

Attended:
Upcoming:
We'll begin shortly reviewing conferences and events planned for the first half of 2019. Highlights are sure to include The North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami (Jan 16-18) and Consensus in NYC (May 14-16). If you have suggestions of events or conferences Decred should attend, please share them in #event_planning. In 2019, we would like to expand our presence in Europe, Asia, and South America, and we're looking for community members to help identify and staff those events. (@Dustorf)

Media

August issue of Decred Journal was translated to Russian. Many thanks to @DZ!
Rency cryptocurrency ratings published a report on Decred and incorporated a lot of feedback from the community on Reddit.
September issue of Chinese CCID ratings was published (snapshot), Decred is still at the bottom.
Videos:
Featured articles:
Articles:

Community Discussions

Community stats:
Comm systems news: Several work channels were migrated to Matrix, #writers_room is finally bridged.
Highlights:
Twitter: why decentralized governance and funding are necessary for network survival and the power of controlling the narrative; learning about governance more broadly by watching its evolution in cryptocurrency space, importance of community consensus and communications infrastructure.
Reddit: yet another strong pitch by @solar; question about buyer protections; dcrtime internals; a proposal to sponsor hoodies in the University of Cape Town; Lightning Network support for altcoins.
Chats: skills to operate a stakepool; voting details: 2 of 3 votes can approve a block, what votes really approve are regular tx, etc; scriptless script atomic swaps using Schnorr adaptor signatures; dev dashboard, choosing work, people do best when working on what interests them most; opportunities for governments and enterprise for anchoring legal data to blockchain; terminology: DAO vs DAE; human-friendly payments, sharing xpub vs payment protocols; funding btcsuite development; Politeia vote types: approval vote, sentiment vote and a defund vote, also linking proposals and financial statements; algo trading and programming languages (yes, on #trading!); alternative implementation, C/C++/Go/Rust; HFTs, algo trading, fake volume and slippage; offline wallets, usb/write-only media/optical scanners vs auditing traffic between dcrd and dcrwallet; Proof of Activity did not inspire Decred but spurred Decred to get moving, Wikipedia page hurdles; how stakeholders could veto blocks; how many votes are needed to approve a proposal; why Decrediton uses Electron; CVE-2018-17144 and over-dependence on single Bitcoin implementation, btcsuite, fuzz testing; tracking proposal progress after voting and funding; why the wallet does not store the seed at all; power connectors, electricity, wiring and fire safety; reasonable spendings from project fund; ways to measure sync progress better than block height; using Politeia without email address; concurrency in Go, locks vs channels.
#support is not often mentioned, but it must be noted that every day on this channel people get high quality support. (@bee: To my surprise, even those poor souls running Windows 10. My greatest respect to the support team!)

Markets

In September DCR was trading in the range of USD 34-45 / BTC 0.0054-0.0063. On Sep 6, DCR revisited the bottom of USD 34 / BTC 0.0054 when BTC quickly dropped from USD 7,300 to 6,400. On Sep 14, a small price rise coincided with both the start of KuCoin trading and hashrate spike to 104 PH/s. Looking at coinmarketcap charts, the trading volume is a bit lower than in July and August.
As of Oct 4, Decred is #18 by the number of daily transactions with 3,200 tx, and #9 by the USD value of daily issuance with $230k. (source: onchainfx)
Interesting observation by @ImacallyouJawdy: while we sit at 2018 price lows the amount locked in tickets is testing 2018 high.

Relevant External

ASIC for Lyra2REv2 was spotted on the web. Vertcoin team is preparing a new PoW algorithm. This would be the 3rd fork after two previous forks to change the algorithm in 2014 and 2015.
A report titled The Positive Externalities of Bitcoin Mining discusses the benefits of PoW mining that are often overlooked by the critics of its energy use.
A Brief Study of Cryptonetwork Forks by Alex Evans of Placeholder studies the behavior of users, developers and miners after the fork, and makes the cases that it is hard for child chains to attract users and developers from their parent chains.
New research on private atomic swaps: the paper "Anonymous Atomic Swaps Using Homomorphic Hashing" attempts to break the public link between two transactions. (bitcointalk, decred)
On Sep 18 Poloniex announced delisting of 8 more assets. That day they took a 12-80% dive showing their dependence on this one exchange.
Circle introduced USDC markets on Poloniex: "USDC is a fully collateralized US dollar stablecoin using the ERC-20 standard that provides detailed financial and operational transparency, operates within the regulated framework of US money transmission laws, and is reinforced by established banking partners and auditors.".
Coinbase announced new asset listing process and is accepting submissions on their listing portal. (decred)
The New York State Office of the Attorney General posted a study of 13 exchanges that contains many insights.
A critical vulnerability was discovered and fixed in Bitcoin Core. Few days later a full disclosure was posted revealing the severity of the bug. In a bitcointalk thread btcd was called 'amateur' despite not being vulnerable, and some Core developers voiced their concerns about multiple implementations. The Bitcoin Unlimited developer who found the bug shared his perspective in a blog post. Decred's vision so far is that more full node implementations is a strength, just like for any Internet protocol.

About This Issue

This is the 6th issue of Decred Journal. It is mirrored on GitHub, Medium and Reddit. Past issues are available here.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Feedback is appreciated: please comment on Reddit, GitHub or #writers_room on Matrix or Slack.
Contributions are also welcome: some areas are adding content, pre-release review or translations to other languages.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Dustorf, jz, Haon, oregonisaac, raedah and Richard-Red.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

Will crypto mining kill polar bears?

Bitcoin mining uses as much electricity as a small country. Many people hate it for this reason, its one of the more popular arguments against crypto currencies. Will crypto mining kill polar bears? I think not. I think it will help save polar bears. "Bear" with me.
Germany produces a significant part of its electricity from renewable energy: wind and solar. As we all know, these sources are intermittent and seasonal, as is demand. When the share of renewable energy in the overall energy mix becomes large enough, the result is inevitable: temporary and seasonal overcapacity. This isnt just theoretical, energy prices in germany and the UK where effectively negative last Christmas: http://www.businessinsider.com/renewable-power-germany-negative-electricity-cost-2017-12//?r=AU&IR=T
As explained in the above article, this isnt a rare freak occurrence, its expected and this will have to be become much more common if as a society, we want to transition away from fossil fuels. Because to do that we need (much) more renewable energy sources. A study I saw for Germany calculated they needed at least 89% more capacity, just to handle peak loads. But that also implies an incredible amount of overcapacity when demand isnt anywhere near peak, or when supply is above average due to favorable weather. Storing excess renewable electricity, in most places is very expensive and inefficient. So much so that its rarely even done. This is a major problem. Wind turbines are therefore feathered, solar panels turned off, excess electricity dumped in giant electrical heaters, offered for free or even offered at negative prices. Renewable energy may have become cheaper than other forms per KWH, but thats only if when you can sell all of your production. And its only true if the consumption occurs near the renewable energy source and not 100s or 1000s of kilometers further. Building capacity that can only be used 50% or even 10% of the time, or building infrastructure to store surplus electricity is still very expensive, as is transporting renewable energy over long distances.
I know what you're thinking. Mining wont help here, because mining intermittently is something that seems crazy today; miners keep their expensive machines on 24/7. But thats only because today, the overall cost structure of a (bitcoin) miner is heavily tilted towards hardware depreciation. Particularly for anyone paying retail prices for mining asics. This will change completely, because of two related reasons:
1) mining efficiency improvements will taper off.
Mining asics have been progressing extremely rapidly, from being based on CPUs and FPGA's, to using 20 year old obsolete 180nm process technology in the first asics, to state of the art 16nm chips today. This has resulted in at least a million fold improvement in efficiency in just a few years, which in turn lead to hardware investments that needed to be recovered in a few months or even weeks (!) before they were obsolete. Opportunity cost has been so high, that miners have literally chartered 747s to transport new mining equipment from the manufacturer in China to their datacenters in the US.
This cant and wont last. 12nm and 7nm asics are about to be produced, or are being produced now. It doesnt get better than that today, and it wont for many years to come. Moore's law is often cited to show efficiency will keep going up. That may be true, but until now the giant leaps we have seen had nothing to do with moore's law, which "only" predicts a doubling every 18 months. Moore's law is also hitting a brick wall (you cant scale transistors smaller than atoms), and only states that transistor density increases. Not that chips become more efficient or faster, which increasingly is no longer happening (new cpu's are getting more cores, but run at comparable speeds and comparable power consumption to previous generations).
What all this means is that these upcoming state of the art mining asics will remain competitive for many years, at least 3, possibly more than 5 years, and thus can be used and written off over that many years. But they will still consume electricity during all those years, shifting the overall costs from hardware to electricity.
2) Mining is still too profitable (for anyone making their own asics) and mining hardware is therefore still too expensive (for everyone else)
Miner hardware production rate simply hasnt yet been able to keep up with demand and soaring bitcoin prices. This leads to artificially low mining difficulty, making mining operationally profitable even with expensive electricity, and this also leads to exuberant hardware profit margins. You can see this easily, just look at the difficulty of bitcoin. When the price dropped by 70%, did you see a corresponding drop in difficulty? No, no drop at all, it just keeps growing exponentially. That only makes sense because we are not yet near saturation, or near marginal electricity costs for bitmain & Co. Its not worth it yet for them to turn off their miners. Its not even worth it yet for residential miners. Another piece of evidence for this, is bitmains estimated $4 billion profit. But mining is a zero sum game, over time, market forces will drive hardware prices and the mining itself to become only marginally profitable. We're clearly not close to that -yet. You might think so as a private miner, but thats only because you overpaid for your hardware.
Lets look at todays situation to get an idea. An Antminer S9 retails for $2300 and uses ~1300W at the wall. If you write off the hardware over a year, electricity and hardware costs balance out at an electricity price of $0.2/KWH. Anything below that, and hardware becomes the major cost. But how will that evolve?
As difficulty keeps going up, bitcoin mining revenue per asic will decline proportionally, until demand for mining asics will eventually taper off. To counter that, prices of asics will be lowered until they approach marginal production costs, which by my estimate is closer to $200 than $2000. Let say a 1300W S9 equivalent at that point gets sold at $400 leaving bitmain a healthy profit margin; that would mean each year a miner would spend 5x more on electricity than on hardware. Hardware will remain competitive for more than a single year though. Say you write it off over 3 years, now you're spending 15x more on electricity than on hardware. Intermittent mining like 50% of the time, but with free or virtually free electricity will become economical long before that.
By now, I will hopefully have convinced you of the viability of mining with intermittent excess renewable energy; intermittent mining with renewable energy will not only become viable, it will become the only way to do it profitably. Renewable energy at the source is already cheaper than any carbon burning source. Even in Quatar, they install solar plants because its cheaper than burning their own gas. Its transporting and storing the electricity that usually is the problem. Gas can easily be transported and stored. Wind and solar energy can not. And thats a massive problem for the industry. But mining doesnt need either. You can mine pretty much anywhere and anytime. All you need besides electricity, is a few containers and an internet connection for a solar plant or wind farm to monetize excess energy.
Moreover, mining is a zero sum game, a race to the bottom. As long as its profitable for green energy providers to deploy more hardware (which will be true as long as they can at least recover their hardware investment), difficulty will go up. Until it becomes unprofitable for anyone who has to pay for his electricity. No one gives oil, coal or gas away for free, so anyone depending on those sources of electricity, can not remain competitive. If bitcoin price were to go up so much, that there isnt enough renewable electricity production in the world to accommodate the hashrate, bitcoin miners will simply install more solar and wind farms. Not because of their ecological awareness, but because it makes the most financial sense. And during peak demand periods, why wouldnt they turn off the miners and sell their electricity to the grid for a premium?
Basically crypto mining would fund renewable energy development, and solve the exact problem laid out in the article linked above: provide overcapacity of renewable energy to handle grid peak loads, without needing any government funding or taxation on carbon based sources, without needing expensive and very inefficient energy storage. From the perspective of a green energy producer, energy storage, like a battery or hydrogen production, is just an expensive and intermediate step between producing electricity and getting paid for that electricity. Crypto mining will do the same thing, converting excess electricity in to cash, only much more efficiently.
TL:DR, deploying more renewable electricity overcapacity is both very expensive and very necessary if we want to save polar bears. Financing for these large scale green energy projects will either have to come from tax payer money to store or subsidise the largely unused excess electricity, or it will come from crypto mining. Market forces will drive crypto mining to use the cheapest energy. Renewable energy already is cheaper per KWH than carbon based power, and nothing is cheaper than excess and thus free (or negative value) renewable energy. Bitcoin mining's carbon foot print will therefore become ~zero. If you take in to account the effect of financing and subsidizing large scale renewable energy development that can also be used to supply the grid during peak demand periods, its carbon footprint will be hugely negative.
BTW, if you wonder what Blockchains LLC is going to do with 61K acres near Tesla's factory; my guess is solar plants and crypto mining. Expect to see renewable energy development and crypto mining to merge in to one single industry. Check out envion to get a glimpse of this future. Im not endorsing their token as an investment, I havent researched it at all, but the market they are going after is a very real one and its about to explode.
submitted by Vertigo722 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

ASIC water heater (Closed / Open Loop)

Edit 180517: Here's an article on motherboard.vice.com about this project. Thanks, Jordan! I enjoyed the read!
My ASIC waste heat recycling design is public domain and free to anyone who wants to use it. This turns any water-heating endeavor into a profitable, or at least cost-reduced, enterprise. Imagine a crypto heated swimming pool, or anything else you could heat with the output from a small, medium, or large-scale mining operation. This design should scale very well if you make the individual parts "bigger." Have fun!
Items used are a water / air intercooler off Ebay fed by 3/4" water hose and a Bosche 12v pump model #0392022002.
Attained water temperatures of 50C / 122F for a week before I took it down.
Closed loop. (Requires Underclock) https://i.imgur.com/l5goioK.jpg
Inside the box. https://i.imgur.com/QpG6dBe.jpg
Open loop (Can run 100%). https://i.imgur.com/kkgwDyr.jpg
The closed-loop is very quiet, the fans don't need to run anywhere near 100% with things underclocked. I ran mine around 30%, and while enclosed the sound is equivalent to a box fan on medium-ish.
The open-loop is good for winter, especially if you can duct it into your HVAC intake.
Both setups can be run in reverse to cool the intake air charge through the intercooler if a cold water source can be obtained. (Cold part of A/C unit dunked in coolant that is fed through the intercooler, for example.)
Edit 180516t1518z: Here is an example of the cooling loop that I have planned. Using this in conjunction with either prototype it should be possible to house any mining operation in any environment, so long as the cost of the cooling loop does not overwhelm the profits produced by the mining equipment. This is best suited to the open-loop configuration in conjunction with intake filters. If you live in the desert and have access to solar power, this may be for you.
Practical use scenarios for closed-loop:
Hot water for a bathtub / hot tub / swimming pool / shower.
Hot water for a radiator system to heat a residence.
Hot water to drive dishwashers / clothes washers.
Sous vide cooking, as pointed out by hazeldoo
Using this as a pre-heater for a boiler. (also could be used for commercial or industrial applications.)
Ex. of industries that user boilers are oil refineries, food canneries, paper mills, etc.
Practical use scenarios for open-loop:
Most of the applications above, plus...
Drying your hair.
Drying your clothes.
Diverting the hot air output into your HVAC to heat your residence as I did, this saved me $80/mo in pure cost during the winter.
Diverting the hot air / water to a single room to create a sauna.
I'm available for hire.
submitted by gta3uzi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Decred Journal — May 2018

Note: New Reddit look may not highlight links. See old look here. A copy is hosted on GitHub for better reading experience. Check it out, contains photo of the month! Also on Medium

Development

dcrd: Significant optimization in signature hash calculation, bloom filters support was removed, 2x faster startup thanks to in-memory full block index, multipeer work advancing, stronger protection against majority hashpower attacks. Additionally, code refactoring and cleanup, code and test infrastructure improvements.
In dcrd and dcrwallet developers have been experimenting with new modular dependency and versioning schemes using vgo. @orthomind is seeking feedback for his work on reproducible builds.
Decrediton: 1.2.1 bugfix release, work on SPV has started, chart additions are in progress. Further simplification of the staking process is in the pipeline (slack).
Politeia: new command line tool to interact with Politeia API, general development is ongoing. Help with testing will soon be welcome: this issue sets out a test plan, join #politeia to follow progress and participate in testing.
dcrdata: work ongoing on improved design, adding more charts and improving Insight API support.
Android: design work advancing.
Decred's own DNS seeder (dcrseeder) was released. It is written in Go and it properly supports service bit filtering, which will allow SPV nodes to find full nodes that support compact filters.
Ticket splitting service by @matheusd entered beta and demonstrated an 11-way split on mainnet. Help with testing is much appreciated, please join #ticket_splitting to participate in splits, but check this doc to learn about the risks. Reddit discussion here.
Trezor support is expected to land in their next firmware update.
Decred is now supported by Riemann, a toolbox from James Prestwich to construct transactions for many UTXO-based chains from human-readable strings.
Atomic swap with Ethereum on testnet was demonstrated at Blockspot Conference LATAM.
Two new faces were added to contributors page.
Dev activity stats for May: 238 active PRs, 195 master commits, 32,831 added and 22,280 deleted lines spread across 8 repositories. Contributions came from 4-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: rapid growth from ~4,000 TH/s at the beginning of the month to ~15,000 at the end with new all time high of 17,949. Interesting dynamic in hashrate distribution across mining pools: coinmine.pl share went down from 55% to 25% while F2Pool up from 2% to 44%. [Note: as of June 6, the hashrate continues to rise and has already passed 22,000 TH/s]
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 91.3 DCR (+0.8), stake participation is 46.9% (+0.8%) with 3.68 million DCR locked (+0.15). Min price was 85.56. On May 11 ticket price surged to 96.99, staying elevated for longer than usual after such a pump. Locked DCR peaked at 47.17%. jet_user on reddit suggested that the DCR for these tickets likely came from a miner with significant hashrate.
Nodes: there are 226 public listening and 405 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 45% on v1.2.0 (up from 24% last month), 39% on v1.1.2, 15% on v1.1.0 and 1% running outdaded versions.

ASICs

Obelisk team posted an update. Current hashrate estimate of DCR1 is 1200 GH/s at 500 W and may still change. The chips came back at 40% the speed of the simulated results, it is still unknown why. Batch 1 units may get delayed 1-2 weeks past June 30. See discussions on decred and on siacoin.
@SiaBillionaire estimated that 7940 DCR1 units were sold in Batches 1-5, while Lynmar13 shared his projections of DCR1 profitability (reddit).
A new Chinese miner for pre-order was noticed by our Telegram group. Woodpecker WB2 specs 1.5 TH/s at 1200 W, costs 15,000 CNY (~2,340 USD) and the initial 150 units are expected to ship on Aug 15. (pow8.comtranslated)
Another new miner is iBelink DSM6T: 6 TH/s at 2100 W costing $6,300 (ibelink.co). Shipping starts from June 5. Some concerns and links were posted in these two threads.

Integrations

A new mining pool is available now: altpool.net. It uses PPLNS model and takes 1% fee.
Another infrastructure addition is tokensmart.io, a newly audited stake pool with 0.8% fee. There are a total of 14 stake pools now.
Exchange integrations:
OpenBazaar released an update that allows one to trade cryptocurrencies, including DCR.
@i2Rav from i2trading is now offering two sided OTC market liquidity on DCUSD in #trading channel.
Paytomat, payments solution for point of sale and e-commerce, integrated Decred. (missed in April issue)
CoinPayments, a payment processor supporting Decred, developed an integration with @Shopify that allows connected merchants to accept cryptocurrencies in exchange for goods.

Adoption

New merchants:
An update from VotoLegal:
michae2xl: Voto Legal: CEO Thiago Rondon of Appcívico, has already been contacted by 800 politicians and negotiations have started with four pre-candidates for the presidency (slack, source tweet)
Blockfolio rolled out Signal Beta with Decred in the list. Users who own or watch a coin will automatically receive updates pushed by project teams. Nice to see this Journal made it to the screenshot!
Placeholder Ventures announced that Decred is their first public investment. Their Investment Thesis is a clear and well researched overview of Decred. Among other great points it noted the less obvious benefit of not doing an ICO:
By choosing not to pre-sell coins to speculators, the financial rewards from Decred’s growth most favor those who work for the network.
Alex Evans, a cryptoeconomics researcher who recently joined Placeholder, posted his 13-page Decred Network Analysis.

Marketing

@Dustorf published March–April survey results (pdf). It analyzes 166 responses and has lots of interesting data. Just an example:
"I own DECRED because I saw a YouTube video with DECRED Jesus and after seeing it I was sold."
May targeted advertising report released. Reach @timhebel for full version.
PiedPiperCoin hired our advisors.
More creative promos by @jackliv3r: Contributing, Stake Now, The Splitting, Forbidden Exchange, Atomic Swaps.
Reminder: Stakey has his own Twitter account where he tweets about his antics and pours scorn on the holders of expired tickets.
"Autonomy" coin sculpture is available at sigmasixdesign.com.

Events

BitConf in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Jake Yocom-Piatt presented "Decentralized Central Banking". Note the mini stakey on one of the photos. (articletranslated, photos: 1 2 album)
Wicked Crypto Meetup in Warsaw, Poland. (video, photos: 1 2)
Decred Polska Meetup in Katowice, Poland. First known Decred Cake. (photos: 1 2)
Austin Hispanic Hackers Meetup in Austin, USA.
Consensus 2018 in New York, USA. See videos in the Media section. Select photos: booth, escort, crew, moon boots, giant stakey. Many other photos and mentions were posted on Twitter. One tweet summarized Decred pretty well:
One project that stands out at #Consensus2018 is @decredproject. Not annoying. Real tech. Humble team. #BUIDL is strong with them. (@PallerJohn)
Token Summit in New York, USA. @cburniske and @jmonegro from Placeholder talked "Governance and Cryptoeconomics" and spoke highly of Decred. (twitter coverage: 1 2, video, video (from 32 min))
Campus Party in Bahia, Brazil. João Ferreira aka @girino and Gabriel @Rhama were introducing Decred, talking about governance and teaching to perform atomic swaps. (photos)
Decred was introduced to the delegates from Shanghai's Caohejing Hi-Tech Park, organized by @ybfventures.
Second Decred meetup in Hangzhou, China. (photos)
Madison Blockchain in Madison, USA. "Lots of in-depth questions. The Q&A lasted longer than the presentation!". (photo)
Blockspot Conference Latam in Sao Paulo, Brazil. (photos: 1, 2)
Upcoming events:
There is a community initiative by @vj to organize information related to events in a repository. Jump in #event_planning channel to contribute.

Media

Decred scored B (top 3) in Weiss Ratings and A- (top 8) in Darpal Rating.
Chinese institute is developing another rating system for blockchains. First round included Decred (translated). Upon release Decred ranked 26. For context, Bitcoin ranked 13.
Articles:
Audios:
Videos:

Community Discussions

Community stats: Twitter 39,118 (+742), Reddit 8,167 (+277), Slack 5,658 (+160). Difference is between May 5 and May 31.
Reddit highlights: transparent up/down voting on Politeia, combining LN and atomic swaps, minimum viable superorganism, the controversial debate on Decred contractor model (people wondered about true motives behind the thread), tx size and fees discussion, hard moderation case, impact of ASICs on price, another "Why Decred?" thread with another excellent pitch by solar, fee analysis showing how ticket price algorithm change was controversial with ~100x cut in miner profits, impact of ticket splitting on ticket price, recommendations on promoting Decred, security against double spends and custom voting policies.
@R3VoLuT1OneR posted a preview of a proposal from his company for Decred to offer scholarships for students.
dcrtrader gained a couple of new moderators, weekly automatic threads were reconfigured to monthly and empty threads were removed. Currently most trading talk happens on #trading and some leaks to decred. A separate trading sub offers some advantages: unlimited trading talk, broad range of allowed topics, free speech and transparent moderation, in addition to standard reddit threaded discussion, permanent history and search.
Forum: potential social attacks on Decred.
Slack: the #governance channel created last month has seen many intelligent conversations on topics including: finite attention of decision makers, why stakeholders can make good decisions (opposed to a common narrative than only developers are capable of making good decisions), proposal funding and contractor pre-qualification, Cardano and Dash treasuries, quadratic voting, equality of outcome vs equality of opportunity, and much more.
One particularly important issue being discussed is the growing number of posts arguing that on-chain governance and coin voting is bad. Just a few examples from Twitter: Decred is solving an imagined problem (decent response by @jm_buirski), we convince ourselves that we need governance and ticket price algo vote was not controversial, on-chain governance hurts node operators and it is too early for it, it robs node operators of their role, crypto risks being captured by the wealthy, it is a huge threat to the whole public blockchain space, coin holders should not own the blockchain.
Some responses were posted here and here on Twitter, as well as this article by Noah Pierau.

Markets

The month of May has seen Decred earn some much deserved attention in the markets. DCR started the month around 0.009 BTC and finished around 0.0125 with interim high of 0.0165 on Bittrex. In USD terms it started around $81 and finished around $92, temporarily rising to $118. During a period in which most altcoins suffered, Decred has performed well; rising from rank #45 to #30 on Coinmarketcap.
The addition of a much awaited KRW pair on Upbit saw the price briefly double on some exchanges. This pair opens up direct DCR to fiat trading in one of the largest cryptocurrency markets in the world.
An update from @i2Rav:
We have begun trading DCR in large volume daily. The interest around DCR has really started to grow in terms of OTC quote requests. More and more customers are asking about trading it.
Like in previous month, Decred scores high by "% down from ATH" indicator being #2 on onchainfx as of June 6.

Relevant External

David Vorick (@taek) published lots of insights into the world of ASIC manufacturing (reddit). Bitmain replied.
Bitmain released an ASIC for Equihash (archived), an algorithm thought to be somewhat ASIC-resistant 2 years ago.
Three pure PoW coins were attacked this month, one attempting to be ASIC resistant. This shows the importance of Decred's PoS layer that exerts control over miners and allows Decred to welcome ASIC miners for more PoW security without sacrificing sovereignty to them.
Upbit was raided over suspected fraud and put under investigation. Following news reported no illicit activity was found and suggested and raid was premature and damaged trust in local exchanges.
Circle, the new owner of Poloniex, announced a USD-backed stablecoin and Bitmain partnership. The plan is to make USDC available as a primary market on Poloniex. More details in the FAQ.
Poloniex announced lower trading fees.
Bittrex plans to offer USD trading pairs.
@sumiflow made good progress on correcting Decred market cap on several sites:
speaking of market cap, I got it corrected on coingecko, cryptocompare, and worldcoinindex onchainfx, livecoinwatch, and cryptoindex.co said they would update it about a month ago but haven't yet I messaged coinlib.io today but haven't got a response yet coinmarketcap refused to correct it until they can verify certain funds have moved from dev wallets which is most likely forever unknowable (slack)

About This Issue

Some source links point to Slack messages. Although Slack hides history older than ~5 days, you can read individual messages if you paste the message link into chat with yourself. Digging the full conversation is hard but possible. The history of all channels bridged to Matrix is saved in Matrix. Therefore it is possible to dig history in Matrix if you know the timestamp of the first message. Slack links encode the timestamp: https://decred.slack.com/archives/C5H9Z63AA/p1525528370000062 => 1525528370 => 2018-05-05 13:52:50.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Your feedback is precious. You can post on GitHub, comment on Reddit or message us in #writers_room channel.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Richard-Red, snr01 and solar.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

How I am helping Bitmain destroy Bitcoin

Just before Christmas, I finally decided to start mining Bitcoin, mainly because my basement is cold enough right now that I could plausibly explain my behavior to my wife.
I bought a used Antminer S7. There aren't a lot of options out there these days if you are in the market for a reasonably priced basement heater that sounds like a shopvac trying to suck up a grapefruit...
Bitmain has emerged as a major threat to the decentralization of Bitcoin. They control too much of the production of mining hardware. They control too much of the hashpower.
I know very little about China, but I remember a podcast from a couple of years ago about how big business works there, and it matches my observations.
Basically, the way it works in China is you throw all of your money at growing your business into a near monopoly. Once you win the war of attrition and all of your significant competitors are bankrupt -- then you can start thinking about turning a profit. Until then it's all losses.
Here is an example from the solar panel industry:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2013/03/23/china-might-stop-providing-the-world-with-cheap-solar-panels/?utm_term=.b98720f61db1
Recall this quote from KNC Mining:
We have tried to calculate the amount of money that the Chinese have invested in mining, we estimate it to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Even with free electricity we cannot see how they will ever get this money back. Either they don’t know what they are doing, but that is not very likely at this scale or they have some secret advantage that we don’t know about. - Sam Cole, KNC CEO
It seems likely that Jihan Wu's strategy is for his company to, for all practical purposes, become the source of all of bitcoin's hashpower, and one way or another, collect all of the transaction fees.
If that is the strategy, a couple of things start to make sense:
  1. The core developers are a major threat to Bitmain's dominance, because they can code a way out from them if they become abusively rent-seeking or an obvious threat to decentralization, or begin censoring transactions at the request of the Comunist Party. The core developers are the only group in position to credibly lead an initiative to change the POW algorithm for example.
  2. The lightning network is an important competitor for fees, and a threat to censorship which must be strangled in the crib. All of the fees must be paid to Bitmain, and it is intolerable for lightning nodes to siphon off fees. All transactions must be subject to a veto from Bitmain -- opaque batching is a no-no.
  3. Threats to centralization are irrelevant. Bitmain's ambition is to deal with the trust problem by winning and controlling the hash-power. Not by cultivating a decentralized ecosystem and separation of power. For the rest of us, well we have to trust Jihan to act in our best interest.
  4. Blocks are going to need to be bigger. MUCH bigger, so that Bitmain can process more and more of the world's transactions and get a larger and larger amount of fees. Your ability to run a full node on your home computer is not a priority.
  5. The Chinese government probably doesn't have any problem with this, and possibly is throwing money at Bitmain to make it happen. After all, they will ultimately be able to steer Bitmain, and therefore Bitcoin, in whatever direction is beneficial to the Communist Party.
How are my conspiracy theory skillz?
Another thing to think about. The big block crowd has for a long time used discussion in ways that remind me of the pro-Trump propaganda that flooded Reddit for the past year. (e.g. name-calling, accusations, speaking to passions, black-and-white thinking, thought narrowing labels) To the big blocker guys who may be reading, I'm sure I sound like a suppressive person. :-) I wouldn't want to accuse all of you of being paid shills. Even if we know that Roger Ver appreciates the power of incentivizing social proof so much that he is developing tools to help shills get paid in clever and innovative ways.

Edit:

This got a little more attention than I thought and I want to soften my stance somewhat.
This is speculation on my part. I don't know what Bitmain's strategy is. They may have pretty benign plans.
It isn't my desire to bash Bitmain or say they are a bad company or lead by bad people. Indeed, I am helping them in a small way by propping up the secondary market for their products. I don't condemn myself for that; I don't condemn them for trying to be the #1 ASIC manufacturer.
I'm very glad Bitmain is in business, making high quality bitcoin miners, and selling them to the public.
I hope I don't come off sounding critical of Chinese culture. I'm sure there are things about Chinese culture worth criticizing, just as there are things about American culture worth criticizing, but I know very little about Chinese culture and am not interested in making judgments about it. As has been pointed out in this thread, the attrition strategy is not unique to Chinese companies -- it is inherent in the economics of competing companies. It is my impression that for whatever reason (cultural/regulatory/legal/political...whatever) the attrition strategy is more widespread or pronounced in China than it is in the USA.
Ultimately, moral tools (e.g. praise and blame, trying to modify desires) are going to be too weak to create the strong foundation Bitcoin needs. What we need is good game theory, diffusion of power, and opponent processes pushing on each other with negative feedback loops dampening the system to stability.
I originally wanted to buy an Antminer R4, which was billed as quiet. They sell out quickly, leading me to believe that an under-served market exists for home mining. A lot of people have cold basements. A quiet miner pulling 1200 watts in a non-hideous housing for about $500-$1000 would find a niche. Bonus points if the hashing boards can be pulled out and upgraded each winter.
submitted by moral_agent to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

MinedBlock - Mining As A Service

MinedBlock - Mining As A Service

https://preview.redd.it/2nz3e8z2xpv21.png?width=306&format=png&auto=webp&s=1d839e275e476dc6cb79b022d04fcb172da952bf
MinedBlock offers the opportunity for investors to purchase our ST20 Security Token which is a digital asset backed by a corresponding Preference Share in MinedBlock Holding Limited (the Special Purpose Vehicle) that enables holders to receive a revenue share produced by our mining farms. Collectively, MBTX token holders will own 95% of the Special Purpose Vehicle and the associated costs and revenue so, therefore, will receive the revenue share each month based on the profit generated. Revenue will be shared respectively and equally between all token holders on a ‘payout per token’ model.
Strategy Mining activities will be continuously monitored and switched between coins when the difficulty and success rates fluctuate. The ultimate goal will be to maintain maximum efficiency at all times. Mining equipment will be regularly resold and replaced. There will be a split between suppliers of ASIC miners to prevent any kind of centralisation and to increase diversity available for customers to utilise. MinedBlock will evaluate whether mining as part of an existing mining pool or being reliant on our own hash rate output is the most effective to produce coins.
Hardware MinedBlock will utilise a mixture of ASIC token units alongside Custom Built GPU Mining Rigs.
Locations Electricity costs and climate are the key considerations for choice of location as well as considering the political attitude of hosting Countries towards crypto mining, the last thing we would want it to build a mining farm somewhere and then it become a restricted activity. The first phase of our Mining Farm build will be using ASIC Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash mining units as they are built ready to use. These will be hosted from a facility in Iceland where the climate and electricity costs are favourable. Our GPU mining rigs will be built, configured and run from the United Kingdom initially to ensure they are reliable and easy to manage remotely before moving them to a facility in either Iceland, Canada or Sweden.
Adapting to Change Mining cryptocurrency isn’t as simple as ‘plug and play and walk away’, the team at MinedBlock will constantly be monitoring our mining activities and evaluating where we could switch the miners to an alternative currency to increase profitability. Upcoming updates and forks will also be monitored to ensure we are always ready to adapt.
Token info
Ticker: MBTX Type: Utility-token Token price in USD: 1 MBTX = 0.15 USD Accepted currencies: BTC BCH LTC ETH Bonus program: Pre Sale Stage 1: 90% discount Pre Sale Stage 2: 85% discount Token distribution: 91.25% - Pre-Sale 3.75% - Founders 3.37% - Retained 1.25% - Airdrop 0.38% - Airdrop Funds allocation: 80% - Mining Equipment 10% - Datacenter Build 10% - Reserve
MinedBlock ICO Roadmap
Q1 2018 / Project Concept Developed
Q2 2018 / Whitepaper Written Company Name and Branding Defined Q3 2018 / Website and Social Channels Launched / Whitepaper Released / Token Sale Announced / Token Sale Starts / Airdrop and Bounty Schemes Revealed
Q4 2018 / Initial ASIC and GPU Orders Placed / Datacenter Spaces Agreed
Q1 2019 / Mining Farm Builds / Mining Begins / Exchange Listings
Q2 2019 / Token Sale Ends / Final ASIC and GPU Orders Placed
Q3 2019 / Revenue Distribution Begins / Token Buy Back Starts
Q4 2019 and Beyond / Solar Farm Feasibility Study / Hosted Mining Service / TBC

Website: https://www.minedblock.io/
Whitepaper: https://www.minedblock.io/assets/MinedBlockWhitepaper.pdf
Bounty0x ID: ecamli
submitted by ecamli to BountyICO [link] [comments]

Is there a small, efficient, miner out there that the average person could use to further decentralize the network?

Is there a small, efficient, miner out there that most Bitcoin users/enthusiasts could use to contribute to the network? I'm not talking about being a professional miner. I'm speaking of simply setting something up that doesn't require like a 220V, or any highly technical skillset, without regard for any ROI potential, to help contribute to, and protect, our network?
If not, we need one. I don't know if it ideally should be a 2.5 - 5W USB device, or maybe however big one could be to run off a solar panel, or what... but I assume the technology isn't going to advance at the rate it has over the first few years of ASICs. Perhaps now someone could develop a miner for the rest of us. An emphasis on efficiency, and overall consumption being below some max, so that just about anyone can contribute without having to heavily augment their budget.
We need to refocus on decentralization, and privacy, if we want to keep Bitcoin.
submitted by JustPuggin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

ASIC Water Heater (Closed / Open Loop)

Edit 180517: Here's an article on motherboard.vice.com about this project. Thanks, Jordan! I enjoyed the read!
Design is free to anyone who wants to use it. This turns any water-heating endeavor into a profitable, or at least cost-reduced, enterprise. Imagine a crypto heated swimming pool, or anything else you could heat with the output from a small, medium, or large-scale mining operation. This design should scale very well if you make the individual parts "bigger." Have fun!
Items used are a water / air intercooler off Ebay fed by 3/4" water hose and a Bosche 12v pump model #0392022002.
Attained water temperatures of 50C / 122F for a week before I took it down.
Closed loop. (Requires Underclock) https://i.imgur.com/l5goioK.jpg
Inside the box. https://i.imgur.com/QpG6dBe.jpg
Open loop (Can run 100%). https://i.imgur.com/kkgwDyr.jpg
The closed-loop is very quiet, the fans don't need to run anywhere near 100% with things underclocked. I ran mine around 30%, and while enclosed the sound is equivalent to a box fan on medium-ish.
The open-loop is good for winter, especially if you can duct it into your HVAC intake.
Both setups can be run in reverse to cool the intake air charge through the intercooler if a cold water source can be obtained. (Cold part of A/C unit dunked in coolant that is fed through the intercooler, for example.)
Edit 180516t1518z: Here is an example of the cooling loop that I have planned. Using this in conjunction with either prototype it should be possible to house any mining operation in any environment, so long as the cost of the cooling loop does not overwhelm the profits produced by the mining equipment. This is best suited to the open-loop configuration in conjunction with intake filters. If you live in the desert and have access to solar power, this may be for you.
Practical use scenarios for closed-loop:
Hot water for a bathtub / hot tub / swimming pool / shower.
Hot water for a radiator system to heat a residence.
Hot water to drive dishwashers / clothes washers.
Sous vide cooking, as pointed out by hazeldoo
Using this as a pre-heater for a boiler. (also could be used for commercial or industrial applications.)
Ex. of industries that user boilers are oil refineries, food canneries, paper mills, etc.
Practical use scenarios for open-loop:
Most of the applications above, plus...
Drying your hair.
Drying your clothes.
Diverting the hot air output into your HVAC to heat your residence as I did, this saved me $80/mo in pure cost during the winter.
Diverting the hot air / water to a single room to create a sauna.
I'm available for hire.
submitted by gta3uzi to litecoin [link] [comments]

AMD's Growing CPU Advantage Over Intel

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4152240-amds-growing-cpu-advantage-intel?page=1
AMD's Growing CPU Advantage Over Intel Mar. 1.18 | About: Advanced Micro (AMD)
Raymond Caron, Ph.D. Tech, solar, natural resources, energy (315 followers) Summary AMD's past and economic hazards. AMD's Current market conditions. AMD Zen CPU advantage over Intel. AMD is primarily a CPU fabrication company with much experience and a great history in that respect. They hold patents for 64-bit processing, as well as ARM based processing patents, and GPU architecture patents. AMD built a name for itself in the mid-to-late 90’s when they introduced the K-series CPU’s to good reviews followed by the Athlon series in ‘99. AMD was profitable, they bought the companies NexGen, Alchemy Semiconductor, and ATI. Past Economic Hazards If AMD has such a great history, then what happened? Before I go over the technical advantage that AMD has over Intel, it’s worth looking to see how AMD failed in the past, and to see if those hazards still present a risk to AMD. As for investment purposes we’re more interested in AMD’s turning a profit. AMD suffered from intermittent CPU fabrication problems, and was also the victim of sustained anti-competitive behaviour from Intel who interfered with AMD’s attempts to sell its CPU’s to the market through Sony, Hitachi, Toshiba, Fujitsu, NEC, Dell, Gateway, HP, Acer, and Lenovo. Intel was investigated and/or fined by multiple countries including Japan, Korea, USA, and EU. These hazard needs to be examined to see if history will repeat itself. There have been some rather large changes in the market since then.
1) The EU has shown they are not averse to leveling large fines, and Intel is still fighting the guilty verdict from the last EU fine levied against them; they’ve already lost one appeal. It’s conceivable to expect that the EU, and other countries, would prosecute Intel again. This is compounded by the recent security problems with Intel CPU’s and the fact that Intel sold these CPU’s under false advertising as secure when Intel knew they were not. Here are some of the largest fines dished out by the EU
2) The Internet has evolved from Web 1.0 to 2.0. Consumers are increasing their online presence each year. This reduces the clout that Intel can wield over the market as AMD can more easily sell to consumers through smaller Internet based companies.
3) Traditional distributors (HP, Dell, Lenovo, etc.) are struggling. All of these companies have had recent issues with declining revenue due to Internet competition, and ARM competition. These companies are struggling for sales and this reduces the clout that Intel has over them, as Intel is no longer able to ensure their future. It no longer pays to be in the club. These points are summarized in the graph below, from Statista, which shows “ODM Direct” sales and “other sales” increasing their market share from 2009 to Q3 2017. 4) AMD spun off Global Foundries as a separate company. AMD has a fabrication agreement with Global Foundries, but is also free to fabricate at another foundry such as TSMC, where AMD has recently announced they will be printing Vega at 7nm.
5) Global Foundries developed the capability to fabricate at 16nm, 14nm, and 12nm alongside Samsung, and IBM, and bought the process from IBM to fabricate at 7nm. These three companies have been cooperating to develop new fabrication nodes.
6) The computer market has grown much larger since the mid-90’s – 2006 when AMD last had a significant tangible advantage over Intel, as computer sales rose steadily until 2011 before starting a slow decline, see Statista graph below. The decline corresponds directly to the loss of competition in the marketplace between AMD and Intel, when AMD released the Bulldozer CPU in 2011. Tablets also became available starting in 2010 and contributed to the fall in computer sales which started falling in 2012. It’s important to note that computer shipments did not fall in 2017, they remained static, and AMD’s GPU market share rose in Q4 2017 at the expense of Nvidia and Intel.
7) In terms of fabrication, AMD has access to 7nm on Global Foundries as well as through TSMC. It’s unlikely that AMD will experience CPU fabrication problems in the future. This is something of a reversal of fortunes as Intel is now experiencing issues with its 10nm fabrication facilities which are behind schedule by more than 2 years, and maybe longer. It would be costly for Intel to use another foundry to print their CPU’s due to the overhead that their current foundries have on their bottom line. If Intel is unable to get the 10nm process working, they’re going to have difficulty competing with AMD. AMD: Current market conditions In 2011 AMD released its Bulldozer line of CPU’s to poor reviews and was relegated to selling on the discount market where sales margins are low. Since that time AMD’s profits have been largely determined by the performance of its GPU and Semi-Custom business. Analysts have become accustomed to looking at AMD’s revenue from a GPU perspective, which isn’t currently being seen in a positive light due to the relation between AMD GPU’s and cryptocurrency mining.
The market views cryptocurrency as further risk to AMD. When Bitcoin was introduced it was also mined with GPU’s. When the currency switched to ASIC circuits (a basic inexpensive and simple circuit) for increased profitability (ASIC’s are cheaper because they’re simple), the GPU’s purchased for mining were resold on the market and ended up competing with and hurting new AMD GPU sales. There is also perceived risk to AMD from Nvidia which has favorable reviews for its Pascal GPU offerings. While AMD has been selling GPU’s they haven’t increased GPU supply due to cryptocurrency demand, while Nvidia has. This resulted in a very high cost for AMD GPU’s relative to Nvidia’s. There are strategic reasons for AMD’s current position:
1) While the AMD GPU’s are profitable and greatly desired for cryptocurrency mining, AMD’s market access is through 3rd party resellers whom enjoy the revenue from marked-up GPU sales. AMD most likely makes lower margins on GPU sales relative to the Zen CPU sales due to higher fabrication costs associated with the fabrication of larger size dies and the corresponding lower yield. For reference I’ve included the size of AMD’s and Nvidia’s GPU’s as well as AMD’s Ryzen CPU and Intel’s Coffee lake 8th generation CPU. This suggests that if AMD had to pick and choose between products, they’d focus on Zen due higher yield and revenue from sales and an increase in margin.
2) If AMD maintained historical levels of GPU production in the face of cryptocurrency demand, while increasing production for Zen products, they would maximize potential income for highest margin products (EPYC), while reducing future vulnerability to second-hand GPU sales being resold on the market. 3) AMD was burned in the past from second hand GPU’s and want to avoid repeating that experience. AMD stated several times that the cryptocurrency boom was not factored into forward looking statements, meaning they haven’t produced more GPU’s to expect more GPU sales.
In contrast, Nvidia increased its production of GPU’s due to cryptocurrency demand, as AMD did in the past. Since their Pascal GPU has entered its 2nd year on the market and is capable of running video games for years to come (1080p and 4k gaming), Nvidia will be entering a position where they will be competing directly with older GPU’s used for mining, that are as capable as the cards Nvidia is currently selling. Second-hand GPU’s from mining are known to function very well, with only a need to replace the fan. This is because semiconductors work best in a steady state, as opposed to being turned on and off, so it will endure less wear when used 24/7.
The market is also pessimistic regarding AMD’s P/E ratio. The market is accustomed to evaluating stocks using the P/E ratio. This statistical test is not actually accurate in evaluating new companies, or companies going into or coming out of bankruptcy. It is more accurate in evaluating companies that have a consistent business operating trend over time.
“Similarly, a company with very low earnings now may command a very high P/E ratio even though it isn’t necessarily overvalued. The company may have just IPO’d and growth expectations are very high, or expectations remain high since the company dominates the technology in its space.” P/E Ratio: Problems With The P/E I regard the pessimism surrounding AMD stock due to GPU’s and past history as a positive trait, because the threat is minor. While AMD is experiencing competitive problems with its GPU’s in gaming AMD holds an advantage in Blockchain processing which stands to be a larger and more lucrative market. I also believe that AMD’s progress with Zen, particularly with EPYC and the recent Meltdown related security and performance issues with all Intel CPU offerings far outweigh any GPU turbulence. This turns the pessimism surrounding AMD regarding its GPU’s into a stock benefit. 1) A pessimistic group prevents the stock from becoming a bubble. -It provides a counter argument against hype relating to product launches that are not proven by earnings. Which is unfortunately a historical trend for AMD as they have had difficulty selling server CPU’s, and consumer CPU’s in the past due to market interference by Intel. 2) It creates predictable daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly fluctuations in the stock price that can be used, to generate income. 3) Due to recent product launches and market conditions (Zen architecture advantage, 12nm node launching, Meltdown performance flaw affecting all Intel CPU’s, Intel’s problems with 10nm) and the fact that AMD is once again selling a competitive product, AMD is making more money each quarter. Therefore the base price of AMD’s stock will rise with earnings, as we’re seeing. This is also a form of investment security, where perceived losses are returned over time, due to a stock that is in a long-term upward trajectory due to new products reaching a responsive market.
4) AMD remains a cheap stock. While it’s volatile it’s stuck in a long-term upward trend due to market conditions and new product launches. An investor can buy more stock (with a limited budget) to maximize earnings. This is advantage also means that the stock is more easily manipulated, as seen during the Q3 2017 ER.
5) The pessimism is unfounded. The cryptocurrency craze hasn’t died, it increased – fell – and recovered. The second hand market did not see an influx of mining GPU’s as mining remains profitable.
6) Blockchain is an emerging market, that will eclipse the gaming market in size due to the wide breath of applications across various industries. Vega is a highly desired product for Blockchain applications as AMD has retained a processing and performance advantage over Nvidia. There are more and rapidly growing applications for Blockchain every day, all (or most) of which will require GPU’s. For instance Microsoft, The Golem supercomputer, IBM, HP, Oracle, Red Hat, and others. Long-term upwards trend AMD is at the beginning of a long-term upward trend supported by a comprehensive and competitive product portfolio that is still being delivered to the market, AMD referred to this as product ramping. AMD’s most effective products with Zen is EPYC, and the Raven Ridge APU. EPYC entered the market in mid-December and was completely sold out by mid-January, but has since been restocked. Intel remains uncompetitive in that industry as their CPU offerings are retarded by a 40% performance flaw due to Meltdown patches. Server CPU sales command the highest margins for both Intel and AMD.
The AMD Raven Ridge APU was recently released to excellent reviews. The APU is significant due to high GPU prices driven buy cryptocurrency, and the fact that the APU is a CPU/GPU hybrid which has the performance to play games available today at 1080p. The APU also supports the Vulcan API, which can call upon multiple GPU’s to increase performance, so a system can be upgraded with an AMD or Nvidia GPU that supports Vulcan API at a later date for increased performance for those games or workloads that been programmed to support it. Or the APU can be replaced when the prices of GPU’s fall.
AMD also stands to benefit as Intel confirmed that their new 10 nm fabrication node is behind in technical capability relative to the Samsung, TSMC, and Global Foundries 7 nm fabrication process. This brings into questions Intel’s competitiveness in 2019 and beyond. Take-Away • AMD was uncompetitive with respect to CPU’s from 2011 to 2017 • When AMD was competitive, from 1996 to 2011 they did record profit and bought 3 companies including ATI. • AMD CPU business suffered from: • Market manipulation from Intel. • Intel fined by EU, Japan, Korea, and settled with the USA • Foundry productivity and upgrade complications • AMD has changed • Global Foundries spun off as an independent business • Has developed 14nm &12nm, and is implementing 7nm fabrication • Intel late on 10nm, is less competitive than 7nm node • AMD to fabricate products using multiple foundries (TSMC, Global Foundries) • The market has changed • More AMD products are available on the Internet and both the adoption of the Internet and the size of the Internet retail market has exploded, thanks to the success of smartphones and tablets. • Consumer habits have changed, more people shop online each year. Traditional retailers have lost market share. • Computer market is larger (on-average), but has been declining. While Computer shipments declined in Q2 and Q3 2017, AMD sold more CPU’s. • AMD was uncompetitive with respect to CPU’s from 2011 to 2017. • Analysts look to GPU and Semi-Custom sales for revenue. • Cryptocurrency boom intensified, no crash occurred. • AMD did not increase GPU production to meet cryptocurrency demand. • Blockchain represents a new growth potential for AMD GPU’s. • Pessimism acts as security against a stock bubble & corresponding bust. • Creates cyclical volatility in the stock that can be used to generate profit. • P/E ratio is misleading when used to evaluate AMD. • AMD has long-term growth potential. • 2017 AMD releases competitive product portfolio. • Since Zen was released in March 2017 AMD has beat ER expectations. • AMD returns to profitability in 2017. • AMD taking measureable market share from Intel in OEM CPU Desktop and in CPU market. • High margin server product EPYC released in December 2017 before worst ever CPU security bug found in Intel CPU’s that are hit with detrimental 40% performance patch. • Ryzen APU (Raven Ridge) announced in February 2018, to meet gaming GPU shortage created by high GPU demand for cryptocurrency mining. • Blockchain is a long-term growth opportunity for AMD. • Intel is behind the competition for the next CPU fabrication node. AMD’s growing CPU advantage over Intel About AMD’s Zen Zen is a technical breakthrough in CPU architecture because it’s a modular design and because it is a small CPU while providing similar or better performance than the Intel competition.
Since Zen was released in March 2017, we’ve seen AMD go from 18% CPU market share in the OEM consumer desktops to essentially 50% market share, this was also supported by comments from Lisa Su during the Q3 2017 ER call, by MindFactory.de, and by Amazon sales of CPU’s. We also saw AMD increase its market share of total desktop CPU’s. We also started seeing market share flux between AMD and Intel as new CPU’s are released. Zen is a technical breakthrough supported by a few general guidelines relating to electronics. This provides AMD with an across the board CPU market advantage over Intel for every CPU market addressed.
1) The larger the CPU the lower the yield. - Zen architecture that makes up Ryzen, Threadripper, and EPYC is smaller (44 mm2 compared to 151 mm2 for Coffee Lake). A larger CPU means fewer CPU’s made during fabrication per wafer. AMD will have roughly 3x the fabrication yield for each Zen printed compared to each Coffee Lake printed, therefore each CPU has a much lower cost of manufacturing.
2) The larger the CPU the harder it is to fabricate without errors. - The chance that a CPU will be perfectly fabricated falls exponentially with increasing surface area. Intel will have fewer high quality CPU’s printed compared to AMD. This means that AMD will make a higher margin on each CPU sold. AMD’s supply of perfect printed Ryzen’s (1800X) are so high that the company had to give them away at a reduced cost in order to meet supply demands for the cheaper Ryzen 5 1600X. If you bought a 1600X in August/September, you probably ended up with an 1800X.
3) Larger CPU’s are harder to fabricate without errors on smaller nodes. -The technical capability to fabricate CPU’s at smaller nodes becomes more difficult due to the higher precision that is required to fabricate at a smaller node, and due to the corresponding increase in errors. “A second reason for the slowdown is that it’s simply getting harder to design, inspect and test chips at advanced nodes. Physical effects such as heat, electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic interference are more pronounced at 7nm than at 28nm. It also takes more power to drive signals through skinny wires, and circuits are more sensitive to test and inspection, as well as to thermal migration across a chip. All of that needs to be accounted for and simulated using multi-physics simulation, emulation and prototyping.“ Is 7nm The Last Major Node? “Simply put, the first generation of 10nm requires small processors to ensure high yields. Intel seems to be putting the smaller die sizes (i.e. anything under 15W for a laptop) into the 10nm Cannon Lake bucket, while the larger 35W+ chips will be on 14++ Coffee Lake, a tried and tested sub-node for larger CPUs. While the desktop sits on 14++ for a bit longer, it gives time for Intel to further develop their 10nm fabrication abilities, leading to their 10+ process for larger chips by working their other large chip segments (FPGA, MIC) first.” There are plenty of steps where errors can be created within a fabricated CPU. This is most likely the culprit behind Intel’s inability to launch its 10nm fabrication process. They’re simply unable to print such a large CPU on such a small node with high enough yields to make the process competitive. Intel thought they were ahead of the competition with respect to printing large CPU’s on a small node, until AMD avoided the issue completely by designing a smaller modular CPU. Intel avoided any mention of its 10nm node during its Q4 2017 ER, which I interpret as bad news for Intel shareholders. If you have nothing good to say, then you don’t say anything. Intel having nothing to say about something that is fundamentally critical to its success as a company can’t be good. Intel is on track however to deliver hybrid CPU’s where some small components are printed on 10nm. It’s recently also come to light that Intel’s 10nm node is less competitive than the Global Foundries, Samsung, and TSMC 7nm nodes, which means that Intel is now firmly behind in CPU fabrication. 4) AMD Zen is a new architecture built from the ground up. Intel’s CPU’s are built on-top of older architecture developed with 30-yr old strategies, some of which we’ve recently discovered are flawed. This resulted in the Meltdown flaw, the Spectre flaws, and also includes the ME, and AMT bugs in Intel CPU’s. While AMD is still affected by Spectre, AMD has only ever acknowledged that they’re completely susceptible to Spectre 1, as AMD considers Spectre 2 to be difficult to exploit on an AMD Zen CPU. “It is much more difficult on all AMD CPUs, because BTB entries are not aliased - the attacker must know (and be able to execute arbitrary code at) the exact address of the targeted branch instruction.” Technical Analysis of Spectre & Meltdown * Amd Further reading Spectre and Meltdown: Linux creator Linus Torvalds criticises Intel's 'garbage' patches | ZDNet FYI: Processor bugs are everywhere - just ask Intel and AMD Meltdown and Spectre: Good news for AMD users, (more) bad news for Intel Cybersecurity agency: The only sure defense against huge chip flaw is a new chip Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign Take-Away • AMD Zen enjoys a CPU fabrication yield advantage over Intel • AMD Zen enjoys higher yield of high quality CPU’s • Intel’s CPU’s are affected with 40% performance drop due to Meltdown flaw that affect server CPU sales.
AMD stock drivers 1) EPYC • -A critically acclaimed CPU that is sold at a discount compared to Intel. • -Is not affected by 40% software slow-downs due to Meltdown. 2) Raven Ridge desktop APU • - Targets unfed GPU market which has been stifled due to cryptocurrency demand - Customers can upgrade to a new CPU or add a GPU at a later date without changing the motherboard. • - AM4 motherboard supported until 2020. 3) Vega GPU sales to Intel for 8th generation CPU’s with integrated graphics. • - AMD gains access to the complete desktop and mobile market through Intel.
4) Mobile Ryzen APU sales • -Providing gaming capability in a compact power envelope.
5) Ryzen and Threadripper sales • -Fabricated on 12nm in April. • -May eliminate Intel’s last remaining CPU advantage in IPC single core processing. • -AM4 motherboard supported until 2020. • -7nm Ryzen on track for early 2019. 6) Others: Vega, Polaris, Semi-custom, etc. • -I consider any positive developments here to be gravy. Conclusion While in the past Intel interfered with AMD's ability to bring it's products to market, the market has changed. The internet has grown significantly and is now a large market that dominates when in computer sales. It's questionable if Intel still has the influence to affect this new market, and doing so would most certainly result in fines and further bad press.
AMD's foundry problems were turned into an advantage over Intel.
AMD's more recent past was heavily influenced by the failure of the Bulldozer line of CPU's that dragged on AMD's bottom line from 2011 to 2017.
AMD's Zen line of CPU's is a breakthrough that exploits an alternative, superior strategy, in chip design which results in a smaller CPU. A smaller CPU enjoys compounded yield and quality advantages over Intel's CPU architecture. Intel's lead in CPU performance will at the very least be challenged and will more likely come to an end in 2018, until they release a redesigned CPU.
I previously targeted AMD to be worth $20 by the end of Q4 2017 ER. This was based on the speed that Intel was able to get products to market, in comparison AMD is much slower. I believe the stock should be there, but the GPU related story was prominent due to cryptocurrency craze. Financial analysts need more time to catch on to what’s happening with AMD, they need an ER that is driven by CPU sales. I believe that the Q1 2018 is the ER to do that. AMD had EPYC stock in stores when the Meltdown and Spectre flaws hit the news. These CPU’s were sold out by mid-January and are large margin sales.
There are many variables at play within the market, however barring any disruptions I’d expect that AMD will be worth $20 at some point in 2018 due these market drivers. If AMD sold enough EPYC CPU’s due to Intel’s ongoing CPU security problems, then it may occur following the ER in Q1 2018. However, if anything is customary with AMD, it’s that these things always take longer than expected.
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Miner Litecoin TTBit USB ASIC Raspberry solar power miner usb bitcoin mining Avalon Bitcoin Miner running at 80ghs How much did I make mining bitcoin using solar for two ... $7000 ASIC Miner Mined $1000 Dollars in Bitcoin in a Month ... Solar Power for Mining Bitcoin part 1

Solar energy is certainly a great supplement to offset the gargantuan energy bills you get from running a large mining farm. Bitcoin’s price is still too unstable to warrant a large-scale solar mining farm. But the future for both Bitcoin and solar energy costs look optimistic, and it may certainly be viable not too long from now. Just not now. Bitcoin mining is effective only when there is a net benefit in regard to productivity and low cost of running. They are high on consuming electricity and there are users who often combine rigs and ASIC chips just to bring the costs even lower. The ASIC miners are designed to basically work and be co-joined with the mining rigs. This cost has included all solar panels, power controls, batteries, and the Antminer S9 ASIC processor. When fully operational, each miner brings in a profit of about $18 per day. Balance Between ... Think of a Bitcoin ASIC as specialized Bitcoin mining computers, Bitcoin mining machines, or “bitcoin generators”. Nowadays all serious Bitcoin mining is performed on dedicated Bitcoin mining hardware ASICs, usually in thermally-regulated data-centers with low-cost electricity. MinePeon is an arm mining platform for the earlier generation of bitcoin miners (ASIC & FPGA) that interfaced with a computer via USB. It ran on the Raspberry PI 1 & 2 and there was even a version or two for the Beagle Bone Black making it a very cheap and efficient alternative to running a full PC.

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Miner Litecoin TTBit USB ASIC Raspberry solar power miner usb bitcoin mining

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