Armory Bitcoin Core Install - Bitcoin Armory Scanning ...

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

note: I had to reupload this because reddit is banning my original account for no reason. I appealed but I thought maybe someone wanted to have this content online.
Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
submitted by RedditShadowbangedMe to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
edit: cd git dir.
submitted by AmbitiousSpeed0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Linux Live USB help needed.

Can't buy a Ledger or trezor now.
To be a bit safer, I tried using an ubuntu live usb and also tried Tails, but I ran into a lot of trouble:
1) Ubuntu live: Cannot install electrum as it will not install python-qt4 and python-pip as needed. Can't install electrum using the orange bag (software center or something like this).
2) Ubuntu live: Cannot install bitcoin armory as well. Downloaded the .deb file, double clicked, clicked install... Nothing happens.
3) Tails: Created Intermediary usb drive, then created permanent one. As I don't trust the preinstalled electrum app (bitcoin and trust on the same sentence is just wrong), I wanted to install it using the commands on electrum site. Not able to install the python-pip.
Can someone help? Is there an easier distro to do this? I would prefer Ubuntu because I trust it more than other distros, but what am I doing wrong?
Cheers.
submitted by cryptosnake to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Colored coin client preview #1 (based on Bitcoin Armory)

I think it's already good enough for people to play with it. (Although certainly it's not ready for anything serious.)
For people who are not familiar with concept, colored coins is a technology which allows people to represent arbitrary tokens (e.g. issue private currencies, stocks, bonds, etc.) using small quantities of bitcoins. It is interesting because it would allow us to create decentralized and secure markets. (As decentralized and secure as Bitcoin itself, at least in theory.) See here.
Notes about current release:
Windows binaries: http://killerstorm.xen.prgmr.com/alex/ArmoryX-0.2.5.zip
There are no Linux binaries, but it's really easy to build it on Ubuntu or Debian:
(Note: if you're already using Armory, it is a good idea to hide you ~/.armory so it won't be seen by this experimental Armory mod. Or, perhaps, just don't run this experimental mod.)
Before you run it, make sure that bitcoind or Bitcoin-Qt is running and fully sync'ed. Armory takes up to 10 minutes to start (this version is slower because it additionally scans for colored transactions) and requires ~ 1 GB of RAM.
At start it will offer to create a wallet, do not enable encryption, otherwise issuing colored coins won't work.
Send some bitcoins to this new wallet, 0.02 BTC is probably enough to issue some colored coins and to pay for tx fees.
There is a drop down to choose color. Balance is displayed for a currently chosen color (i.e. if you chose TESTcc it will show how many TESTcc units this wallet owns), and when you send coins you send coins of that color.
Initially 'uncolored' is selected, it means normal BTC. This drop down also has TESTcc ("test colored coins") and "All colors" (this mode is just for debugging, you cannot send coins in this mode).
Here's what you can do now:
  1. Ask somebody to send you TESTcc. (We want to make it automatic, Satoshi Dice style, but unfortunately that code isn't quite ready.)
  2. Find and install other color definitions.
  3. Issue your own colored coins and send them to somebody who wants them. (LOL.)
Let's start from option #3. There is 'Hallucinate' menu. (It is called 'hallucinate' because colors do not exist on blockchain level, it is a client-side convention.) Choose 'Issue colored coins'. Likely all you need to change is name, but you can tweak satoshi-per-unit and number of units if you want.
When you click Issue it will create a new transaction (using your uncolored BTC) and will create a color definition. Optionally it will also upload your color definition to color definition registry. (This registry runs on my server, it might be down.)
You should note ColorID, this is how other people can refer to these coins (name is ambiguous).
You can now choose this new color in drop down and it will show your balance. (E.g. 1000 units.)
Now you'll perhaps want to send these coins to somebody. That person would need to install your color definition first. If you send colored coins without warning they might be lost, i.e. mixed with uncolored ones. For same reason it makes no sense to send them to wallet which isn't color aware.
For example, you can post on some forum:
I've issued LOLwut coins (ColorID: 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54), each unit represents a bond with face value of 0.1 BTC payable by me, Trololo, via buy back. I promise to buy back all bonds in a month.
Now people who are interested in this LOLwut coin issue will copy ColorID, paste it into Hallucinate > Download color definition dialog, and if this color definition is published it will be downloaded and installed. Armory restart is required to complete installation.
After installation that person will be able to see these LOLwut coins.
Note that if you do not trust my registration server, you can publish color definition yourself: go to ~/.armory/colordefs, find 36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and upload it to your web server. Then you can give people URL like http://example.com/36738fe78a443656535503efb585fee140a37d54.colordef and they can download it by URL.
Or they can just obtain this file by any means and copy it to ~/.armory/colordefs directory. It is decentralized, nobody can prevent you from issuing colored coins.
I think that's all. There is also Hallucinate > Manage color definitions dialog, but I hope it's easy to figure out how it works.
We are working on improved version, particularly on p2p exchange feature.
I've set up an IRC channel for people to talk about trying out colored coins: #colored-coins-otc on Freenode.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

is this safe cold storage?

Here is the method I plan to use for creating a cold storage, I am very new to all this, and have never used bitcoin before, I am not very technical either, anyway, here it is:
1) create a live-cd with ubuntu (on a DVD, not install anything on the hard-drive, I assume everything will be deleted once I turn off the system).
2) install Armory on ubuntu, create an encrypted wallet using the client (encryption just in case the wallet files does not delete for some reason when I turn off the os). I write down encryption key on a paper.
3) generate an address for receiving bitcoin, write down the private and public key on a paper
4) generate a paper backup for my armory wallet, write down the root-code to this on a paper using the "create paper backup" feature of armory.
5) If I ever want to send any bitcoins from my wallet and address I delete the wallet and address later. I only send bitcoins by generating a send signature using armory offline wallet that is temporary installed on a live cd. The wallet will never and have never touched the internet.
This way I should be able to always have access to receive and send my bitcoins if I still have the paper where I wrote down wallet encryption key, bitcoin addresses and wallet root code, and don't have to worry about data curruption or other hardware/software problems.
Is this a safe method? I plan to put about $10000 in bitcoins now, but just want to hear what you think about it before :) sorry for beeing a noob to this. I have read about generating codes offline using bitaddress.org as a HTML file, but I have not seen enough people checking their code to see if it is pregenerated and not as "random" as one might think.
Thanks!
submitted by snobbus to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

(1) Is it true that encrypting an *existing* bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file will "invalidate" any existing backups? (2) Can I use unicode characters - eg ♥ - in the bitcoin-qt wallet passphrase?

I have an existing bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file which I want to encrypt - using the command in the bitcoin-qt Settings menu, involving creating a passphrase.
I have 2 (possibly somewhat related) questions:
TL;DR
(1) If you encrypt an existing wallet.dat file, will the backups of the old wallet.dat file still work?
(2) Can you include unicode characters - eg ♥ - in the passphrase used to encrypt a bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file?
Worst-case scenario: The answers to (1) and (2) are both "no" - and I attempt to encrypt an existing wallet using unicode, and my backups no longer work (due to a new pool of addresses somehow being created?) and the passphrase isn't what I think it is (due to the unicode characters somehow being misinterpreted?) - and then I could lose all my coins??
Details
(1) The following (old, short) thread claims that after you encrypt an existing wallet, any previous backups of that wallet will no longer work:
https://pay.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1ccfdk/encrypting_walletdat_in_bitcoinqt/
Obviously, the the first response in that thread was slightly wrong, for saying that the "server" creates a new pool of 100 addresses to draw on. So using word "server" here was certainly incorrect - but maybe the gist of what they were saying might still be correct? (if you simply change "server" to "client").
I can actually understand that there might be reasons why encrypting a wallet.dat file could cause a new pool of 100 addresses to be generated.
But it does not make sense to me that this would make any older (unencrypted) backups instantly useless.
It seems to me that these older, unencrypted backups would still have their private keys intact, and could thus be used in certain (perhaps limited?) ways - such as:

(2) It seems that including a few unicode characters in the bitcoin-qt wallet passphrase would make it a lot stronger (since unicode is a much larger set of characters than ascii), so I would like to include a few.
But it would be more reassuring if it could be explicitly stated that this is indeed supported.

Possible catastrophic interaction between (1) and (2)?
If the answers to (1) and (2) were both "no" (ie, if you encrypt an existing bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file then any existing backups will not work, and unicode characters do not work in bitcoin-qt passphrases), then I'm worried there could be some kind of catastrophic interaction between (1) and (2) where I lose all my coins, as follows:
(1) I encrypt my existing wallet - making my old, unencrypted wallet.dat file now invalidated (due to something involving a new pool of addresses being generated?)
and
(2) I use a passphrase which includes unicode characters which bitcoin-qt appears to accept at the time of creation, but which doesn't work at the time of trying to decrypt the wallet.dat file (due to something going wring with how the supposed unicode characters are actually interpreted while being entered or copied-and-pasted?).
In this possible worst-case scenario, my old backups of wallet.dat no longer work, and my newly encrypted wallet.dat has some password which I'm not able to correctly enter anymore.
Sorry to be so paranoid about this!
Other remarks:
(a) I did do a (limited) test of unicode capability for bitcoin-qt wallet.dat passphrases: simply by creating a new (empty) wallet.dat file, and creating a passphrase for it involving unicode characters, and then attempting to change the passphrase (which requires entering the old passphrase that contained unicode characters).
This did seem to work ok: it let me re-enter the old passphrase (which included unicode characters) to create a new passphrase.
However, since this is an empty wallet (and since bitcoin-qt would ask for the passphrase only when attempting to actually spend from an encrypted wallet), I did not see a way to fully test whether the passphrase actually worked to decrypt a unicode-passphrase-encrypted wallet for the purpose of spending from it.
(I'm still downloading the rest of the blockchain and it's going to take at least another week on my slow connection, so don't see how I could send a small amount to the new wallet to test it either. My existing wallet.dat file was originally created on an internet-connected machine a long time ago, but it's been offline ever since, so in some sense it's kinda-sorta been in somewhat "cold" storage all this time, and I would prefer to avoid putting it online on a "hot" internet-connected machine until absolutely necessary.)
(b) Long-term, I am actually also in the process of setting up a proper cold storage system based on Armory, which I have installed on 2 Ubuntu machines (one offline and one online).
But I have a slow internet connection, and the backups of this old wallet.dat file have been sitting around unencrypted for ages (I've been relying simply on then being physically inaccessible).
Now some "things" are coming up over the next few days where I some better security right away, and it's probably going to take over a week for Armory/bitcoind to update my local copy of the blockchain.
So in the meantime, I also need some basic additional security right now - so encrypting the existing bitcoin-qt wallet.dat file using a strong passphrase (and making some new backups) seems like it could be a reasonable initial approach.
Thanks for any help!
submitted by encrypt_throwaway to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Cold Storage Questions

So I know there's been posts on this topic before, as well as other guides online, but I still have a few questions after reading them that I was hoping you all could answer. The Bitcoin Armory site has directions for cold storage, but they are pretty general and don't go much into the specifics, so I am using this tutorial as my starting point:
http://falkvinge.net/2014/02/10/placing-your-crypto-wealth-in-cold-storage-installing-armory-on-ubuntu/
So I guess my first question is, is there anything blatantly wrong that you guys see with this tutorial?
2.) Why does the tutorial recommend Ubuntu LTS, is there something you guys would recommend more?
3.) Are python-qt4, python-twisted, and python-psutil still the packages needed to be installed for Armory to function? This article is about 8 months old, so are the directions for installing apt-offline and those three packages still correct?
4.) When downloading Armory on the online computer in order to install on the offline computer, I would like to verify the signature of the download. However, the computer that I currently own is a Mac, and the Armory website says that verifying the signatures is only easily performed on a Linux Machine. I was planning on purchasing a cheap computer to install Linux on and use as my cold storage. I can't imagine that I must purchase two; one to download Armory on and one to use as my cold storage. Could anyone here walk me through how to either verify the signature on a Mac or let me know of some other way to do this securely?
5.) At the bottom on Armory's tutorial, they recommend disabling autorun functionality for USB's in the case of USB virus's (highly unlikely, but if there's something that can be done to prevent it, why not). They link to instructions for Windows, and I was wondering if anyone knew how to get this done on Ubuntu.
I apologize if these questions have been answered before, but I was unable to find them. Thank you in advance for all the help and I appreciate your time; I know topics like this are pretty boring to read/answer compared to the other stuff that's usually posted on bitcoin.
submitted by ArmoryQuestions to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

More Paper Wallet Questions

Was inspired by u/leapyear_0229 to also move my small investment from coinbase to a paper wallet. In researching this, I have the following questions I was hoping you experts could answer!
Say you have a completely offline computer, wiped with Daric’s Boot and Nuke, and then installed with Ubuntu or Linux via USB. Is making a paper wallet as simple as going to bitaddress.org and creating public/private keys and then sending your bitcoin from coinbase to the public key? If so: 1. How does one generate public/private keys from bitaddress if the computer is offline? 2. How does the block chain know that the public key I’m sending my bitcoin to is associated with my specific private key? 3. Everyone keeps talking about Armory and Electrum—what’s the point of these services if I don’t seem to need them to move to paper wallets?
Thank you!
submitted by btcnooob to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Sure Bitcoin is safe Grandma. This is all you have to do to really secure your money

THIS IS FUCKED. BITCOIN HAS NO FUTURE IF WE CAN'T FIND A BETTER WAY TO MAKE IT SECURE. MAIN STREET WILL RUN A MILE FROM IT.
Xpost from: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1d26gw/cold_storage_how_i_did_it/
With the recent events surrounding blockchain.info wallet attacks, I decided to bite the bullet and send all my coins to my cold wallet. It's a bit nerve wrecking but I managed. Here's what I did:
Download offline version of Armory here[1] (section Linux – Offline Bundle for Ubuntu 10.04)
Download Brainwallet source from github[2] for signing transactions, rather than the suggested way from armory website, since I don't want to run a full Bitcoin-qt client + armory to create an unsigned tx. More on this later
Prepare a USB pendrive for linux here[3] using the suggested Ubuntu 10.04 by Armory.
Boot into Linux using that pendrive. Install the Armory software and generate a new wallet. Make sure you make appropriate backup (paper copy or just write down the seed). You can always regenerate your entire wallet via brainwallet.org copy (tab Chains).
If you want, make a watch only copy of your wallet, and you can get all the public address in that wallet from your online computer via Armory offline version. Save the watch only wallet on your windows partition.
Reboot into windows/mac/your main OS.
Install armory and import the watch only wallet to see all of your addresses.
Try to move a small fund into one of the cold-storage addresses. Wait for it to have 6 confirmations. Then we can try to spend that fund by doing the following:
Get unspent output from your cold-storage address: https://blockchain.info/unspent?address=[4] Copy the output into a text file, leave it on your windows machine. Linux copy will be able to read this file.
Boot back into linux on your pendrive. Use saved brainwallet.org website to sign that transaction (use tab Transaction) by pasting the private key of the address (get from Armory, without space) and the unspent output. Sign the message. Then save the output to the same txt file.
Boot back into your main OS. Paste that signed output to http://blockchain.info/pushtx[5] and push it. You're good to go. You spent your fund in your cold storage.
Now, move everything you have from your online storage there.
submitted by BitCoinWarrior to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

HOWTO: Run a Full Bitcoin Node + Armory

Estimated total time: Up to 2 hours, not including blockchain downloading.
You can install this on a VPS, a spare PC, or on your own PC. You can install it in Virtualbox on your own PC, or into Windows. If you just want to try it out, I recommend installing in Virtualbox.
  1. Download and install Virtualbox from (https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads), and download an Ubuntu 14.04 64bit Desktop ISO from http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop, and follow the guide here (I recommend 2GB of RAM, 3GB if you can spare it): http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/virtualbox . It's a little outdated but close enough that things are the same.  
  2. After installing Ubuntu in Virtualbox, to make it fullscreen you will need Guest Additions. Run these commands by clicking on the swirl icon top right, typing ter and opening Terminal: sudo apt-get install build-essentials module-assistant and then sudo m-a prepare Before selecting Devices > Insert Guest Additions CD image, telling Ubuntu to install them, and shutting down. //Thanks go to http://www.binarytides.com/vbox-guest-additions-ubuntu-14-04 for those instructions.//  
  3. Next I went into the Virtual Machines settings and changed Network Adapter 1 to be "Attached to Bridged Network" instead of "Attached to NAT".  
  4. After booting the machine back up, I followed the steps here: https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node/#linux-instructions And installed both bitcoin-qt and bitcoind. Skip over the parts where you edit bitcoin-qt's settings to start at boot, or edit cron to start bitcoind at boot, since this will interfere with using armory.  
  5. Next I followed the instructions here to install Armory: http://bitzuma.com/posts/offline-installation-of-armory-on-tails-and-ubuntu-linux/ The reason I used these instructions was because I was having difficulty getting Armory to install (online or offline) on Ubuntu 14.04. Might just be me.  
  6. I then started up Armory in Offline Mode by clicking on the swirl icon top left and typing Armory. In the program, after clicking Skip, I scrolled down slightly, clicked on Download Bitcoin, Download, and agreed to let it do whatever it wanted to; (which was download and install Satoshi).  
  7. I then closed Armory Offline and opened Armory, which began downloading the blockchain from a torrent. I then went into File > Settings (top left of your screen, near the swirl; menu options will appear once the mouse hits that taskbar) and personally chose to Disable OS and version reporting. There is a setting here for "Enable settings for proxies/Tor" but I haven't ticked it yet, since I haven't set Tor up.  
  8. Follow the instructions here to set up port forwarding so your node is reachable, and to test this: https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node#network-configuration  
Next:
If I want to broadcast transactions over Tor, but not receive incoming connections over Tor, is that a problem for the health of the Bitcoin Tor network? Or will those transactions be broadcast out to "clearnet" nodes, as opposed to hidden ones?
Thanks to all writers of articles referenced here for your help.
By the way, even if you don't want to run a bitcoin node full time, I've read that running one even 6 hours a day is useful. These are instructions for ubuntu but you can also run it from Windows on the same machine you work on (I don't know about privacy implications). Perhaps someone should write an article about running a bitcoin node on your PC at work!
submitted by FullNodeGuide to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

An idea on making cold storage easy

Bitcoin has been gaining a lot of momentum of the years and has attracted a lot of attention. If a big name like PayPal is interested then it seems like Ubuntu would be just as interested, if not more so. Since this company is trusted pretty well and is already one of the most popular components in "Fort Knoxing" your Bitcoins it seems only natural that they should team up with a few of the most reputable cold storage options like multibit and armory. They could then issue a CD directly through the company, maybe even in a discreet mail envelope, that has both ubuntu boot disc with several of these options pre-installed. Money would be made all around and would drive the price up since this is a major hindrance as of now. I'm sure there are other, better options in the works but as a non-technical person this seems like a very possible method if the right people would just be on board.
submitted by messiahsk8er to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Wallet or webpage to monitor paper wallets

Need an application that will allow me to put in several paper wallets (watching only) and monitor the total amount of bitcoins in my account. I usually use Armory, however I can't seem to add paper wallets to the wallets I already have on Armory. It will only allow watching only addresses that were backed up from an offline Armory installation (digital files).
Either a website were I can put the public keys in or an application (I use Ubuntu), to see the total amount of bitcoins, thanks.
Also I do realise that blockchain can do this, but I want it all on one page, as I do have 10+ addresses to monitor.
submitted by Cygnify to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Cold Storage Questions (X-Post from r/Bitcoin)

So I know there's been posts on this topic before, as well as other guides online, but I still have a few questions after reading them that I was hoping you all could answer. The Bitcoin Armory site has directions for cold storage, but they are pretty general and don't go much into the specifics, so I am using this tutorial as my starting point:
http://falkvinge.net/2014/02/10/placing-your-crypto-wealth-in-cold-storage-installing-armory-on-ubuntu/
So I guess my first question is, is there anything blatantly wrong that you guys see with this tutorial?
2.) Why does the tutorial recommend Ubuntu LTS, is there something you guys would recommend more?
3.) Are python-qt4, python-twisted, and python-psutil still the packages needed to be installed for Armory to function? This article is about 8 months old, so are the directions for installing apt-offline and those three packages still correct?
4.) When downloading Armory on the online computer in order to install on the offline computer, I would like to verify the signature of the download. However, the computer that I currently own is a Mac, and the Armory website says that verifying the signatures is only easily performed on a Linux Machine. I was planning on purchasing a cheap computer to install Linux on and use as my cold storage. I can't imagine that I must purchase two; one to download Armory on and one to use as my cold storage. Could anyone here walk me through how to either verify the signature on a Mac or let me know of some other way to do this securely?
5.) At the bottom on Armory's tutorial, they recommend disabling autorun functionality for USB's in the case of USB virus's (highly unlikely, but if there's something that can be done to prevent it, why not). They link to instructions for Windows, and I was wondering if anyone knew how to get this done on Ubuntu.
I apologize if these questions have been answered before, but I was unable to find them. Thank you in advance for all the help and I appreciate your time; I know topics like this are pretty boring to read/answer compared to the other stuff that's usually posted.
submitted by ArmoryQuestions to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

For those of you who keep a significant amount of Bits in hardware cold storage using something like armory, what risk management steps are you taking?

I've been considering buying a cheap netbook and installing Ubuntu on it and running Armory to keep some of my Bitcoins in cold storage. However, I can't help but think that one day I'll go in to withdraw my coins and find my hard drive is corrupted. Sure, I might be a little paranoid, but we could be talking several thousand dollars worth of currency in the distant future. What steps are you guys taking to avoid a situation such as this?
submitted by brcreeker to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory: Multiple users on the same computer? & other questions

Hi,
I've got 3 people in my house interested in bitcoin. We would need to upgrade computers from what we have to use the Armory online & offline computer armory system (to get long term cold storage).
ELI5
Do I have any security concerns if we get something like an iMac, and the three users run Armory on 3 separate accounts? Will any wallet info from one account's Armory cross over to another account?
From here, can we all use the same computer (that's never been online) to run offline armory and make separate paper wallets?
Another question for the offline computer - When people talk about running Armory on Ubuntu, do they mean both the OS and program are running ON the USB stick? Or does Armory run in Ubuntu installed as a virtual system on a windows computer?
When USB sticks are used between the online and offline computer, do you need to wipe them clean somehow or do they end up being 'burner' USB sticks that I have to destroy?
Do I have to worry about the safety of printers? I'm not sure if mine ever needs to communicate with the internet or not, and I think it might have some sort of file storage capability. Not sure if that means anything.
Thanks for your patience and I appreciate any help I can get.
submitted by SibbitHooble to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up (Video) - YouTube Setting up cold storage in Armory on Ubuntu 14.04

Next, update Ubuntu’s software package lists: $ sudo apt-get update Finally, install Bitcoin core itself. Enter “Y” when asked asked for permission to continue: $ sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt This last command may take some time, during which both Bitcoin Core and all of its dependencies will be installed. Run Bitcoin Core Bitcoin Core Install Ubuntu; Unable to bitcoin core install ubuntu lock nifty 10500 call Into my guest linux VMs or Ever since I installed Ubuntu, keyboard auto . Quot; Bitcoin Armory Requirements; Copay is a Bitcoin wallet by Bitpay and available on Forex Trading Video Tutorials Free Choose your wallet De Giro Kosten Overzicht Download the one labeled "Armory 0.96.0 for Ubuntu/Debian 64-bit with GCC 5.3". To install it, you can open the terminal, cd to the directory containing the downloaded deb file, and type sudo dpkg -i armory_0.96-gcc5.4_amd64.deb Since I'm using armory I don't know if it'll be bitcoind or armory will need configuring (I think it's bitcoind). Thanks to all writers of articles referenced here for your help. By the way, even if you don't want to run a bitcoin node full time, I've read that running one even 6 hours a day is useful. I installed Bitcoin Armory on Ubuntu 13.10. I get the following output when I try to run it: ... How do I install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 17.04? 1. Armory scan hangs each time on Ubuntu 16.04. 4. ... To avoid repeating "one"

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Rick Astley - Never Gonna Give You Up (Video) - YouTube

- A USB stick (a small one will do fine). For step-by-step guidance, enable the subtitles! ... How to install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 14.04 - Duration: 7:00. Bitcoin Beginner 8,443 views. 7:00. Rick Astley's official music video for “Never Gonna Give You Up” Listen to Rick Astley: https://RickAstley.lnk.to/_listenYD Subscribe to the official Rick As... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.

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